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This may come as a surprise : how prior knowledge of information in a fear appeal is associated with message outcomes

dc.contributor.authorDavis, Burten_ZA
dc.contributor.authorJansen, Carelen_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-05T12:25:41Z
dc.date.available2016-10-05T12:25:41Z
dc.date.issued2016-09en_ZA
dc.identifier.citationDavis, B. & Jansen, C. 2016. This may come as a surprise : how prior knowledge of information in a fear appeal is associated with message outcomes. Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research, 42(3):398-421, doi:10.1080/02500167.2016.1209536en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn1753-5379 (online)
dc.identifier.issn0250-0167 (print)
dc.identifier.otherdoi:10.1080/02500167.2016.1209536
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/99695
dc.descriptionCITATION: Davis, B. & Jansen, C. 2016. This may come as a surprise : how prior knowledge of information in a fear appeal is associated with message outcomes. Communicatio: South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research, 42(3):398-421, doi:10.1080/02500167.2016.1209536.en_ZA
dc.descriptionThe original publication is available at http://www.tandfonline.com
dc.description.abstractTwo related studies were performed aimed at finding if and how prior knowledge of threat and efficacy information in a fear appeal message is associated with message outcomes (attitude and behavioural intentions). the extended Parallel Process model (ePPm) (Witte 1992; 1998) served as theoretical framework for one study about a chlamydia fear appeal (n = 57) and another about an alcohol abuse fear appeal (n = 59). Findings from both studies suggest that prior knowledge of threat information is hardly relevant for readers’ reactions to a fear appeal message. Prior knowledge of efficacy information, however, proved to play a more important role, most often in a positive way. Findings from both studies furthermore suggest that the ePPm may be incorrect in assuming that individual differences – in this case, in prior knowledge – may only affect fear appeal outcomes in an indirect way, that is through different perceptions of threat and efficacy.en_ZA
dc.description.urihttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02500167.2016.1209536?needAccess=true
dc.format.extent25 pagesen_ZA
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_ZA
dc.publisherUnisa Press
dc.subjectHealth communicationen_ZA
dc.subjectIndividual differencesen_ZA
dc.subjectPrior learningen_ZA
dc.subjectFear -- Psychological aspectsen_ZA
dc.titleThis may come as a surprise : how prior knowledge of information in a fear appeal is associated with message outcomesen_ZA
dc.typeArticleen_ZA
dc.description.versionPublisher's version
dc.rights.holderAuthors retain copyright


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