Migration of bacteriocins across gastrointestinal epithelial and vascular endothelial cells, as determined using in vitro simulations

Dreyer, Leane ; Smith, Carine ; Deane, Shelly M. ; Dicks, Leon M. T. ; Van Staden, Anton D. (2019-08-07)

CITATION: Dreyer, L., et al. 2019. Migration of bacteriocins across gastrointestinal epithelial and vascular endothelial cells, as determined using in vitro simulations. Scientific Reports, 9:11481, doi:10.1038/s41598-019-47843-9.

The original publication is available at https://www.nature.com

Publication of this article was funded by the Stellenbosch University Open Access Fund

Article

Little is known about the migration of bacteriocins across human cells. In this study, we report on migration of three bacteriocins nisin, plantaricin 423 and bacST4SA across colonic adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Bacteriocins were fluorescently labelled while still maintaining antimicrobial activity. Migration of fluorescently labelled bacteriocins across monolayers was assessed in vitro using transmigration well inserts. After 3 h, 75% of nisin, 85% of plantaricin 423 and 82% of bacST4SA migrated across the Caco-2 cell monolayer. Over the same time span, 88% nisin, 93% plantaricin 423 and 91% bacST4SA migrated across the HUVEC monolayer. The viability of both cell types remained unchanged when exposed to 50 µM of nisin, plantaricin 423 or bacST4SA. The effect of human plasma on bacteriocin activity was also assessed. Activity loss was dependent on bacteriocin type and concentration, with the class-IIa bacteriocins retaining more activity compared to nisin. This is the first report of bacteriocins migrating across simulated gastrointestinal- and vascular-barriers. This study provides some of the first evidence that bacteriocins are capable of crossing the gut-blood-barrier. However, in vivo studies need to be performed to confirm these findings and expand on the role of bacteriocin migration across cell barriers

Please refer to this item in SUNScholar by using the following persistent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/106371
This item appears in the following collections: