HIV and/or AIDS-related deaths and modifiable risk factors : a descriptive study of medical admissions at Oshakati Intermediate Hospital in Northern Namibia

Mgori, N. K. (2015-12-09)

CITATION: Mgori, N. K. & Mash, R. 2015. HIV and/or AIDS-related deaths and modifiable risk factors : a descriptive study of medical admissions at Oshakati Intermediate Hospital in Northern Namibia. African Journal of Primary Health Care and Family Medicine, 7(1):1-7, doi:10.4102/phcfm.v7i1.883.

The original publication is available at http://www.phcfm.org

Article

Introduction: High rates of HIV infection have decreased life expectancy in many African countries. Regardless of worldwide efforts to escalate treatment, care and prevention strategies, the number of deaths due to AIDS related disorders is still high. Local health care workers at Oshakati state hospital in Namibia suspect that there are modifiable factors in the care of HIV/AIDS patients, which can be identified and improved upon. Objective: To describe the HIV/AIDS related causes of adult mortality and identify modifiable factors amongst patients admitted to Oshakati hospital. Methods: Data was extracted retrospectively and coded using the modified CoDe protocol for AIDS. Modifiable factors relating to the patient, health system or clinical care were identified using a standardised data collection tool. Results: A total of 177 HIV/AIDS patients were identified, 94 (53.1%) were male and 120 (68%) had CD4 count less than 200 cells/ml. The common HIV related death were tuberculosis (25.9%), renal failure (15.8%), Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (11.3%), Cryptococcal meningitis (9%), HIV wasting syndrome (7.9%) and AIDS defining malignancy (7.9%). The analysis revealed 281 modifiable factors; patient related factors were the commonest 153 (54.4%), followed by health system factors 97 (34.5%) and health care personnel factors 31 (11%). Conclusion: Findings have highlighted the challenges in overall HIV/AIDS inpatient care and surrounding primary care facilities. The identification of specific modifiable factors can be used to reduce mortality by providing training as well as rational monitoring, planning and resource allocation.

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