The polyphasic taxonomy of penicillium and talaromyces spp. isolated from the diverse Fynbos biome

Visagie, Cobus Meyer (2012-12)

Thesis (PhD)--Stellenbosch University, 2012.

Thesis

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Summary The genus Penicillium is well known and occurs in a diverse range of terrestrial environments. Its main function is the decomposition of organic materials and the impact on our everyday lives is far reaching. They cause various rots of food crops as pre-­‐ and postharvest pathogens, produce an immense range of enzymes and secondary metabolites important for biotechnology and are common indoor air irritants. These characters contribute to their economic importance. In the movement towards single name nomenclature, recent taxonomic revision of the family Trichocomaceae resulted in the incorporation of Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium into its previously associated teleomorph genus Talaromyces. Approximately 300 species are currently accepted for Penicillium and Talaromyces. However, despite the importance of this genus, very little is known about the distribution and ecology of this group in South Africa. Studies traditionally focused on environments of economic importance and some of the unique natural habitats were neglected. The importance of the conservation of biodiversity has, however, resulted in a number of studies that explore biodiversity in habitats such as the unique Fynbos biome. The current study focused on the exploration of Penicillium and Talaromyces diversity in the Fynbos biome of the Western Cape. Three sampling sites were chosen, representing three Fynbos types. Sites include Stellenbosch Mountain (Boland granite Fynbos), Malmesbury (Atlantis sand Fynbos) and Struisbaai (Agulhas

Summary The genus Penicillium is well known and occurs in a diverse range of terrestrial environments. Its main function is the decomposition of organic materials and the impact on our everyday lives is far reaching. They cause various rots of food crops as pre-­‐ and postharvest pathogens, produce an immense range of enzymes and secondary metabolites important for biotechnology and are common indoor air irritants. These characters contribute to their economic importance. In the movement towards single name nomenclature, recent taxonomic revision of the family Trichocomaceae resulted in the incorporation of Penicillium subgenus Biverticillium into its previously associated teleomorph genus Talaromyces. Approximately 300 species are currently accepted for Penicillium and Talaromyces. However, despite the importance of this genus, very little is known about the distribution and ecology of this group in South Africa. Studies traditionally focused on environments of economic importance and some of the unique natural habitats were neglected. The importance of the conservation of biodiversity has, however, resulted in a number of studies that explore biodiversity in habitats such as the unique Fynbos biome. The current study focused on the exploration of Penicillium and Talaromyces diversity in the Fynbos biome of the Western Cape. Three sampling sites were chosen, representing three Fynbos types. Sites include Stellenbosch Mountain (Boland granite Fynbos), Malmesbury (Atlantis sand Fynbos) and Struisbaai (Agulhas

Please refer to this item in SUNScholar by using the following persistent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/71947
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