An analysis of Zambia's emergency medicine registrars' experience in South Africa : lessons for the development of emergency medicine care in Zambia

Mwanza, Kephas Elimon (2019-12)

Thesis (MMed)--Stellenbosch University, 2019.

Thesis

ENGLISH SUMMARY : Background: There is little data regarding experiences of emergency medicine registrars for the development of emergency care in Zambia. This study describes lessons from the Zambia’s emergency medicine registrars’ training experiences at various stages of their training in South Africa and how these lessons will impact emergency care in Zambia. Methods: In this qualitative, descriptive study, semi-structured, telephonic interviews were conducted with current Zambian emergency medicine trainees. Recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim and subjected to inductive content analysis. A total of five interviews were completed and represent the entire population of interest. Results: Participants perceived the current state of both in-hospital and pre-hospital emergency care as just beginning to develop. Human resource constraints and health professionals working in silos were perceived as hallmarks of the Zambian health care system. Local training was viewed as a strategy for dissemination of emergency medicine knowledge. In addition, basic equipment for emergency centres were listed and standardisation was highlighted as being critical for their practice in Zambia. Trainees also identified that both advocacy and a team approach to practice were imperative for rapid improvement in emergency care. Conclusion: There is an urgent need for the establishment of a structured advocacy program for emergency care, promotion of inter-professional collaborative practice for patient safety, and support for local emergency medicine training which have potential for overall emergency care development in Zambia. In addition, the advancement of prehospital care strategies should incorporate community participation.

AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING : Geen opsomming beskikbaar.

Please refer to this item in SUNScholar by using the following persistent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/107042
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