ITEM VIEW

Automation and labour demand : South African students’ awareness and beliefs

dc.contributor.advisorLe Roux, Daniel B.en_ZA
dc.contributor.advisorParry, Douglas A.en_ZA
dc.contributor.authorMbilini, Sakhumzi N.en_ZA
dc.contributor.otherStellenbosch University. Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Dept. of Information Science. Socio-Informatics.en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-17T11:52:23Z
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-11T06:43:45Z
dc.date.available2019-10-17T11:52:23Z
dc.date.available2019-12-11T06:43:45Z
dc.date.issued2019-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/107022
dc.descriptionThesis (MA)--Stellenbosch University, 2019.en_ZA
dc.description.abstractENGLISH SUMMARY : The fourth industrial revolution is characterised by the integration of physical, digital, and biological technologies. We are in the beginning stages of this revolution where it is predicted that the capabilities of machines are predicted to rival and surpass some of the capabilities of human labour. It is predicted that many jobs will be automated during this revolution and human labour will need to acquire skills that will complement automation. The objective of this study is to understand the awareness of automation amongst undergraduate university students in South Africa when making career choices. With the already high unemployment rate in South Africa, it will be necessary to measure the awareness of the future of the labour market for automation. In addition to their awareness, the study investigates as to whether automation is a factor when students make their career decisions. This study is primarily exploratory and uses a quantitative research approach to gather data. A self-administered questionnaire was sent out to all undergraduate students of a research-intensive university in South Africa. The results indicate that students perceive themselves to be aware of automation, however, they do not consider automation when making career decisions. Additionally, the results indicate that external sources of influence do not significantly influence career decisions, students are primarily influenced by their interests and career-related factors.en_ZA
dc.description.abstractAFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING : Geen opsomming beskikbaar.af_ZA
dc.format.extentviii, 105 pages ; illustrations, includes annexure
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_ZA
dc.publisherStellenbosch : Stellenbosch University
dc.subjectAutomationen_ZA
dc.subjectLabor demanden_ZA
dc.subjectCollege students -- South Africa -- Attitudesen_ZA
dc.subjectUCTD
dc.titleAutomation and labour demand : South African students’ awareness and beliefsen_ZA
dc.typeThesisen_ZA
dc.description.versionMasters
dc.rights.holderStellenbosch University


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

ITEM VIEW