Increase anti-poaching law-enforcement or reduce demand for wildlife products? a framework to guide strategic conservation investments

Holden, Matthew H. ; Biggs, Duan ; Brink, Henry ; Bal, Payal ; Rhodes, Jonathan ; McDonald-Madden, Eve (2018)

CITATION: Holden, M. H., et al. 2018. Increase anti-poaching law-enforcement or reduce demand for wildlife products? a framework to guide strategic conservation investments. Conservation Letters, doi:10.1111/conl.12618.

The original publication is available at https://conbio.onlinelibrary.wiley.com

Article

Donors, NGOs, and governments increasingly invest in campaigns to reduce con-sumer demand for wildlife products in an attempt to prevent the decline of overex-ploited and poached species. We provide a novel framework to aid these investmentdecisions based on a demand reduction campaign's return on investment compared toantipoaching law enforcement. A resulting decision rule shows that the relative effec-tiveness of demand reduction compared to increased enforcement depends entirely onsocial and economic uncertainties rather than ecological ones. Illustrative case stud-ies on bushmeat and ivory reveal that campaigning to reduce demand may be morecost-effective than antipoaching enforcement if demand reduction campaigns drivemodest price reductions. The outputs from this framework can link targeted monitor-ing of wildlife product prices to management decisions that protect species threatenedby harvest and trade.

Please refer to this item in SUNScholar by using the following persistent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/106444
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