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From Chile to the South African west coast : first reports of the Chilean stone crab Homalaspis plana (H. Milne Edwards, 1834) and the South American sunstar Heliaster helianthus (Lamarck, 1816) outside their natural ranges

dc.contributor.authorPeters, Koebraaen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Tamara B.en_ZA
dc.contributor.editorGrabowski, Michalen_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-09T07:33:23Z
dc.date.available2019-09-09T07:33:23Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-01
dc.identifier.citationPeters, K. & Robinson, T. B. 2018. From Chile to the South African west coast : first reports of the Chilean stone crab Homalaspis plana (H. Milne Edwards, 1834) and the South American sunstar Heliaster helianthus (Lamarck, 1816) outside their natural ranges. BioInvasions Records, 7(4):421-426, doi:10.3391/bir.2018.7.4.11en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn2242-1300 (online)
dc.identifier.otherdoi:10.3391/bir.2018.7.4.11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/106429
dc.descriptionCITATION: Peters, K. & Robinson, T. B. 2018. From Chile to the South African west coast : first reports of the Chilean stone crab Homalaspis plana (H. Milne Edwards, 1834) and the South American sunstar Heliaster helianthus (Lamarck, 1816) outside their natural ranges. BioInvasions Records, 7(4):421-426, doi:10.3391/bir.2018.7.4.11.en_ZA
dc.descriptionThe original publication is available at https://www.reabic.neten_ZA
dc.description.abstractThe South American multiradiate sunstar Heliaster helianthus (Lamarck, 1816) and the Chilean stone crab Homalaspis plana (H. Milne Edwards, 1834) are marine predators that, previous to this report, have no invasion history. However, during subtidal maintenance of a pier within Saldanha Bay along the South African west coast during 2015–2017, a single individual of each species was detected on the seafloor. Following this, intertidal and subtidal surveys were undertaken in surrounding natural habitats, but no further individuals were recorded. Both species are native to Chile, a region with very similar environmental conditions to the west coast of South Africa and from which other South African marine alien species originate, highlighting the connectedness between these regions and the risk for future transfers and establishment. The presence of two pathways from Chile to South Africa (shipping and aquaculture imports) and closely matching environmental conditions are likely to play a role in future successful introductions of Chilean species to the South African west coast. It is, therefore, recommended that particular attention be paid to monitoring aquaculture imports from the west coast of South America and that incoming vessels from that region be inspected upon arrival. Additionally, both H. heliaster and H. plana should be added to alien species watchlists in South Africa and other regions connected to Chile via marine vectors and which experience similar environmental conditions.en_ZA
dc.description.urihttps://www.reabic.net/journals/bir/2018/Issue4.aspx
dc.format.extent6 pages : illustrations, mapen_ZA
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_ZA
dc.publisherRegional Euro-Asian Biological Invasions Centreen_ZA
dc.subjectAquacultureen_ZA
dc.subjectMarine alien speciesen_ZA
dc.subjectMonitoring aquaculture importsen_ZA
dc.subjectHeliaster helianthus -- South Americaen_ZA
dc.subjectHomalaspis plana -- Chileen_ZA
dc.subjectMarine biological invasionsen_ZA
dc.titleFrom Chile to the South African west coast : first reports of the Chilean stone crab Homalaspis plana (H. Milne Edwards, 1834) and the South American sunstar Heliaster helianthus (Lamarck, 1816) outside their natural rangesen_ZA
dc.typeArticleen_ZA
dc.description.versionPublisher's versionen_ZA
dc.rights.holderAuthors retain copyrighten_ZA


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