Differential sexual network connectivity offers a parsimonious explanation for population-level variations in the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis: a data-driven, model-supported hypothesis

Kenyon, Chris R. ; Delva, Wim ; Brotman, Rebecca M. (2019-01-10)

CITATION: Kenyon, C. R., Delva, W. & Brotman, R. M. 2019. Differential sexual network connectivity offers a parsimonious explanation for population-level variations in the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis : a datadriven, model-supported hypothesis. BMC Women's Health, 19:8, doi:10.1186/s12905-018-0703-0.

The original publication is available at https://bmcwomenshealth.biomedcentral.com

Article

Background: The prevalence of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and vaginal microbiota types varies dramatically between different populations around the world. Understanding what underpins these differences is important, as highdiversity microbiotas associated with BV are implicated in adverse pregnancy outcomes and enhanced susceptibility to and transmission of sexually transmitted infections. Main text: We hypothesize that these variations in the vaginal microbiota can, in part, be explained by variations in the connectivity of sexual networks. We argue: 1) Couple-level data suggest that BV-associated bacteria can be sexually transmitted and hence high sexual network connectivity would be expected to promote the spread of BVassociated bacteria. Epidemiological studies have found positive associations between indicators of network connectivity and the prevalence of BV; 2) The relationship between BV prevalence and STI incidence/prevalence can be parsimoniously explained by differential network connectivity; 3) Studies from other mammals are generally supportive of the association between network connectivity and high-diversity vaginal microbiota. Conclusion: To test this hypothesis, we propose a combination of empirical and simulation-based study designs.

Please refer to this item in SUNScholar by using the following persistent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/105313