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Are the attitudes and practices of foodservice managers, catering personnel and students contributing to excessive food wastage at Stellenbosch University?

dc.contributor.authorMarais, M. L.en_ZA
dc.contributor.authorSmit, Y.en_ZA
dc.contributor.authorKoen, N.en_ZA
dc.contributor.authorLotze, E.en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-05T14:14:03Z
dc.date.available2018-12-05T14:14:03Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationMarais, M. L., et al. 2017. Are the attitudes and practices of foodservice managers, catering personnel and students contributing to excessive food wastage at Stellenbosch University?. South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 30(3):60–67, doi:10.1080/16070658.2017.1267348
dc.identifier.issn1607-0658 (print)
dc.identifier.issn2221-1268 (online)
dc.identifier.otherdoi:10.1080/16070658.2017.1267348
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/104781
dc.descriptionCITATION: Marais, M. L., et al. 2017. Are the attitudes and practices of foodservice managers, catering personnel and students contributing to excessive food wastage at Stellenbosch University?. South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 30(3):60–67, doi:10.1080/16070658.2017.1267348.
dc.descriptionThe original publication is available at https://www.tandfonline.com
dc.description.abstractObjective: The aim was to investigate factors contributing to food wastage by Stellenbosch University (SU) students in selected residences, and to determine the attitudes and practices of students and catering personnel impacting on food waste and a sustainable environment. Design: Cross-sectional, descriptive study. Setting: Stellenbosch University, Western Cape. Subjects: Six foodservice managers, 63 catering personnel and 517 students participated in the study. Outcome measures: A weighed-food wastage study was conducted at seven selected residences during lunch and supper on three non-consecutive weekdays. Food service managers (FSMs) and catering personnel completed interviewer-administered questionnaires, while SU students completed an electronic survey. Results: Ninety percent of students preferred the standard menu options, despite a relatively high average plate waste of 16.9%. More production waste was generated during lunch than supper. The male residence generated more plate waste. Even though students requested larger servings of vegetables, the wastage of these items was high. Factors contributing to wastage were the booking system, menus and serving style, meal plan stipulating the serving of dessert and serving of a large starch portion. All FSMs and 88.5% catering personnel considered it important to reduce food wastage to a minimum. Conclusion: Education of catering personnel and students regarding food waste reduction measures is crucial. A representative forum including students, catering companies and faculty management should be involved when seeking solutions to reduce food wastage and improve communication. By implementing these strategies, a university-wide culture of sustainability with a focus on food waste reduction can be developed and nurtured.en_ZA
dc.description.urihttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/16070658.2017.1267348#.VQcjlpWJhgU
dc.format.extent8 pages ; illustrations
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_ZA
dc.publisherCo-published by Medpharm Publications, NISC (Pty) Ltd and Taylor & Francis Group
dc.subjectFood wasteen_ZA
dc.subjectFood service management -- Stellenbosch Universityen_ZA
dc.subjectCollege students -- Attitudes -- Stellenbosch Universityen_ZA
dc.subjectFood service employees -- Attitudes -- Stellenbosch Universityen_ZA
dc.titleAre the attitudes and practices of foodservice managers, catering personnel and students contributing to excessive food wastage at Stellenbosch University?en_ZA
dc.typeArticleen_ZA
dc.description.versionPublishers version
dc.rights.holderAuthors retian copyright


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