The prevalence of the known risk factors for teenage pregnancy amongst female teenage learners in Mount Ayliff, Eastern Cape, South Africa

Okafor, Sylvester (2011-03)

Thesis (MMed)--Stellenbosch University, 2010.

Thesis

ENGLISH SUMMARY :Background: Teenage pregnancy is a major health problem in South Africa. In Mount Ayliff hospital, Eastern Cape, teenage pregnancy accounts for about 15-20% of deliveries in maternity every month. Teenage pregnancy leads to disruption of education, unemployment, increased rate of STI/HIV infection, unsafe abortion, obstetrics complications and malnutrition amongst children. This study is aimed to determine the prevalence of the known risk factors for teenage pregnancy. Methodology: This is a descriptive study. A sample of teenage learners was randomly selected from grade 10 to 12 learners in Mount Ayliff high school. Anonymous, self administered questionnaires containing relevant questions on contraceptive knowledge/use, family structure, sexual behaviour, alcohol use and sexual abuse were used to collect data. Result: A total of 300 questionnaires were distributed but only 219 completed questionnaires qualified for analysis. In total, 47% of the respondents have had sexual intercourse with the opposite sex and the mean age for first sexual intercourse is 16 years. 65.3% of the respondents have knowledge of contraceptives while 33.8% do not. Among those who have had sexual intercourse before, 68.9% did not use any contraceptive in their first intercourse. Of the sexually active respondents, only 16.3% reported using contraceptive consistently during intercourse. Majority of the respondents (45.2%), were raised up by a single mother and 76.3% do not discuss sex with their parents. The source of information about sex is mainly from friends and media. It was also found that most of the respondents live with parent(s) who are unemployed. A very small fraction of the respondents (7.3%) have been sexually abused and another 7.3% reported indulging in alcohol. Conclusion: Poor knowledge/use of birth control methods, family structure and sexual behaviour are the major risk factors for teenage pregnancy that are prevalent among teenage learners in Mount Ayliff community.

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