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Alcohol use, working conditions, job benefits, and the legacy of the "Dop" system among farm workers in the Western Cape Province, South Africa : hope despite high levels of risky drinking

dc.contributor.authorGossage, J. Phillipen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorSnell, Cudore L.en_ZA
dc.contributor.authorParry, Charles D. H.en_ZA
dc.contributor.authorMarais, Anna-Susanen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorBarnard, Ronelen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorDe Vries, Marleneen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorBlankenship, Jasonen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorSeedat, Sorayaen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorHasken, Julie M.en_ZA
dc.contributor.authorMay, Philip A.en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T14:16:23Z
dc.date.available2016-01-19T14:16:23Z
dc.date.issued2014-07
dc.identifier.citationGossage, J.P. et al. 2014. Alcohol use, working conditions, job benefits, and the legacy of the "Dop" system among farm workers in the Western Cape Province, South Africa: hope despite high levels of risky drinking. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 11(7):7406-7424, doi:10.3390/ijerph110707406.en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn1660-4601 (online)
dc.identifier.otherdoi:10.3390/ijerph110707406
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/98196
dc.descriptionCITATION: Gossage, J.P. et al. 2014. Alcohol use, working conditions, job benefits, and the legacy of the "Dop" system among farm workers in the Western Cape Province, South Africa: hope despite high levels of risky drinking. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 11(7):7406-7424, doi:10.3390/ijerph110707406.en_ZA
dc.descriptionThe original publication is available at http://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph
dc.description.abstractThis study describes alcohol consumption in five Western Cape Province communities. Cross-sectional data from a community household sample (n = 591) describe the alcohol use patterns of adult males and females, and farm workers vs. others. Data reveal that men were more likely to be current drinkers than women, 75.1% vs. 65.8% (p = 0.033); farm laborers were more likely to be current drinkers than individuals in other occupations 83.1% vs. 66.8% (p = 0.004). Group, binge drinking on weekends was the norm; men were more likely to be binge drinkers in the past week than women 59.8% vs. 48.8% (p = 0.086); farm workers were more likely to binge than others 75.0% vs. 47.5% (p < 0.001). The legacy of “Dop” contributes to current risky drinking behaviors. Farm owners or managers were interviewed on 11 farms, they described working conditions on their farms and how the legacy of “Dop” is reflected in the current use of alcohol by their workers. “Dop” was given to farm workers in the past on six of the 11 farms, but was discontinued for different reasons. There is zero tolerance for coming to work intoxicated; farm owners encourage responsible use of alcohol and assist farm workers in getting help for alcohol problems when necessary. The farm owners report some positive initiatives, were ahead of the movement to provide meaningful wages, and provide other important amenities. Further research is needed to assess whether progressive practices on some farms will reduce harmful alcohol use.en_ZA
dc.description.urihttp://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/11/7/7406
dc.format.extent19 pages
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_ZA
dc.publisherMDPIen_ZA
dc.subjectAgricultural laborers -- Alcohol use -- South Africa -- Western Capeen_ZA
dc.subjectAlcoholism -- South Africa -- Western Capeen_ZA
dc.subjectAgricultural laborers -- South Africa -- Western Cape -- Social conditionsen_ZA
dc.titleAlcohol use, working conditions, job benefits, and the legacy of the "Dop" system among farm workers in the Western Cape Province, South Africa : hope despite high levels of risky drinkingen_ZA
dc.typeArticleen_ZA
dc.description.versionPublisher's versionen_ZA
dc.rights.holderAuthors retain copyrighten_ZA


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