Modelling, design and implementation of a small-scale, position sensorless, variable speed wind energy conversion system incorporating DTC-SVM of a PMSG drive with RLC filter

Bouwer, Pieter (2013-03)

Thesis (MScEng)--Stellenbosch University, 2013.


Wind energy has proven to be a viable source of clean energy, and the worldwide demand is growing rapidly. Variable speed topologies, with synchronous generators and full-scale converters, are becoming more popular, and the e ective control of these systems is a current trend in wind energy research. The purpose of this study is the modelling, design, simulation and implementation of a small-scale, variable speed wind energy conversion system, incorporating the position sensorless direct torque control with space vector modulation, of a permanent magnet synchronous generator, including an RLC converter lter. Another aim is the development of a gain scheduling algorithm that facilitates the high level control of the system. Mathematical models of the combined lter-generator model, in the stationary and rotating reference frames, are presented and discussed, from which equivalent approximate transfer functions are derived for the design of the controller gains. The design of the controller gains, RLC lter components, gain scheduling concept and maximum power point tracking controller are presented. It is discovered that the RLC lter damping resistance has a signi cant e ect on the resonance frequency of the system. The system is simulated dynamically in both Simulink and the VHDL-AMS programming language. Additionally, the maximum power point tracking controller is simulated in the VHDL-AMS simulation, including a wind turbine simulator. The simulation results demonstrate good dynamic performance, as well as the variable speed operation of the system. The practical results of torque and speed controllers show satisfactory performance, and correlate well with simulated results. The detailed gain scheduling algorithm is presented and discussed. A nal test of the complete system yields satisfactory practical results, and con rms that the objectives of this thesis have been reached.

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