Unstable angina pectoris secondary to multiple calcified coronary artery masses : successful treatment with coronary artery bypass surgery

Przybojewski, J. Z. ; Barnard, P. M. ; Van Der Walt, J .J. ; Botha, J. A. (1986)

The original publication is available at http://www.samj.org.za

Please cite as follows: Przybojewski, J. Z., Barnard P. M., Van Der Walt J. J. & Botha, J. A. 1986. Unstable angina pectoris secondary to multiple calcified coronary artery masses : successful treatment with coronary artery bypass surgery. South African Medical Journal, 69:694-699.

Article

A 31-year-old doctor's wife suffered from severe unstable angina pectoris (AP) due to two large, heavily calcified masses involving the right coronary artery and the left anterior descending branch of the left coronary artery. The causes of the masses could not be determined with certainty, but in view of the history (which included the ingestion of large quantities of raw boerewors (traditional spiced sausage) and histopathological findings, we believe that they were coronary artery aneurysms which developed secondary to coronary arteritis many years previously. The possibility of echinococcal (hydatid) infection is also discussed. Cardiac surgery entailed total excision of both masses, together with sections of their accompanying coronary arteries which had become fibrotic as a result of the arteritis, and reestablishment of coronary blood flow by the insertion of two saphenous vein coronary artery bypass grafts. Her AP was dramatically relieved and she continues to be asymptomatic without taking anti-anginal drugs.

Please refer to this item in SUNScholar by using the following persistent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/7974
This item appears in the following collections: