An exploration of the relationship between burnout, occupational stress and emotional intelligence in the nursing industry

Brand, Tamari (2007-03)

Thesis (MA (Industrial Psychology))--University of Stellenbosch, 2007.

Thesis

The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between burnout, occupational stress and emotional intelligence (EI) in the nursing industry and to determine whether emotional intelligence is a moderator in the occupational stress and burnout relationship. The existence of these relationships was explored through a non-experimental controlled inquiry. The constructs were defined as follows: burnout, as a syndrome consisting of three components: Emotional Exhaustion, Depersonalisation and a Reduced sense of Personal Accomplishment (Maslach & Jackson, 1986); EI, as the capacity to effectively perceive, express, understand and manage emotions in a professional and effective manner at work (Palmer & Stough, 2001); and Occupational Stress, as an interaction of variables, which involve the relationship between a person and the environment, which is appraised by the individual as taxing or exceeding coping resources and threatening well-being (Schlebusch, 1998). A sample of 220 individuals was randomly selected from a specialist employment agency (in the medical industry) and consisted of two groups, overtime and contract staff, which included those that are contracted to a private hospital group through the employment agency or alternatively, individuals who are permanently employed by the hospital group, but work additional overtime through the agency (contract workers and overtime workers). Three levels were included (1) Registered Nurses, (2) Enrolled Nurses and (3) Auxiliary Nurses. The Maslach Burnout Inventory – Human Services Survey, the Sources of Work Stress Inventory and Swinburne University Emotional Intelligence Test were administered. A hundred and twenty two (122) respondents completed and returned the questionnaires...

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