Investigation into road rumble in a light utility vehicle

Wade, Andrew David (2005-03)

Thesis (MScEng (Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering))--University of Stellenbosch, 2005.

Thesis

Vehicle Noise, Vibration and Harshness (NVH) is now a more important component of the vehicle design process than ever. Road noise is one of the key criteria used by potential buyers (albeit subconsciously) to choose what they perceive as the best vehicle. Road rumble is a key concern for vehicle manufacturers. Light Utility Vehicles (LUVs) are especially sensitive to a low frequency booming noise due to the fundamental acoustic mode that exists in the vehicle cabin. An investigation into this booming noise in an LUV is documented. The noise is identified and quantified after which the source of the noise in the vehicle cabin is identified using NVH techniques such as Acoustic Modal Analysis (AMA), Experimental Modal Analysis (EMA) and Transfer Path Analysis (TPA). The cabin’s fundamental acoustic mode lay at 100 Hz. Finally the source of the vibrations in the vehicle leading to the booming noise in the cabin is identified, along with its transfer path to the cabin. Solutions for the specific vehicle’s booming noise are proposed, two of which are tested with some success. Solutions to the problems associated with the fundamental acoustic mode of LUVs are also proposed and discussed.

Please refer to this item in SUNScholar by using the following persistent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/2636
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