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The influence of attenuation correction and reconstruction techniques on the detection of hypo-perfused lesions in brain SPECT images

dc.contributor.authorGhoorun S.
dc.contributor.authorBaete K.
dc.contributor.authorNuyts J.
dc.contributor.authorGroenewald W.
dc.contributor.authorDupont P.
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-15T16:17:31Z
dc.date.available2011-05-15T16:17:31Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citationNuclear Medicine Communications
dc.identifier.citation27
dc.identifier.citation10
dc.identifier.issn01433636
dc.identifier.other10.1097/01.mnm.0000230076.40856.6a
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/14253
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: We evaluated the effects of attenuation correction and reconstruction techniques on the detection of hypoperfused lesions in brain SPECT imaging. METHODS: A software phantom was constructed using the data available on the BrainWeb database by assigning activity values to grey and white matter. The true attenuation map was generated by assigning attenuation coefficients to six different tissue classes to create a non-uniform attenuation map. The uniform attenuation map was calculated using an attenuation coefficient of 0.15 cm. Hypoperfused lesions of varying intensities and sizes were added. The phantom was then projected as typical SPECT projection data, taking into account attenuation and collimator blurring with the addition of Poisson noise. The projection data were reconstructed using four different methods: filtered back-projection in combination with Chang's first-order attenuation correction using the uniform or the true attenuation map and maximum likelihood iterative reconstruction using the uniform or the true attenuation map. Different Gaussian post-smoothing kernels were applied onto the reconstructed images and the performance of each procedure was analysed using figures of merit such as signal-to-noise ratio, bias and variance. RESULTS: Uniform attenuation correction offered only slight deterioration of the signal-to-noise ratio compared to the true attenuation map. Maximum likelihood produced superior signal-to-noise ratios and lower bias at the same variance in comparison to the filtered back-projection. CONCLUSION: Uniform attenuation correction is adequate for lesion detection while maximum likelihood provides enhanced lesion detection when compared to filtered back-projection. © 2006 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
dc.subjectcysteine ethyl ester tc 99m
dc.subjectarticle
dc.subjectbrain blood flow
dc.subjectbrain damage
dc.subjectbrain mapping
dc.subjectbrain size
dc.subjectcollimator
dc.subjectcomputer assisted diagnosis
dc.subjectcomputer model
dc.subjectcomputer program
dc.subjectcorrelation coefficient
dc.subjectdata analysis software
dc.subjectgray matter
dc.subjectimage analysis
dc.subjectimage reconstruction
dc.subjectmaximum likelihood method
dc.subjectneuroimaging
dc.subjectnormal distribution
dc.subjectphantom
dc.subjectPoisson distribution
dc.subjectradiation attenuation
dc.subjectreference database
dc.subjectsignal noise ratio
dc.subjectsingle photon emission computer tomography
dc.subjectvariance
dc.subjectwhite matter
dc.subjectBrain
dc.subjectBrain Diseases
dc.subjectComputer Simulation
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectImage Processing, Computer-Assisted
dc.subjectLikelihood Functions
dc.subjectModels, Statistical
dc.subjectNormal Distribution
dc.subjectPerfusion
dc.subjectPhantoms, Imaging
dc.subjectPoisson Distribution
dc.subjectSoftware
dc.subjectTomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon
dc.titleThe influence of attenuation correction and reconstruction techniques on the detection of hypo-perfused lesions in brain SPECT images
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionArticle


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