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Beijing and Haarlem genotypes are overrepresented among children with drug-resistant tuberculosis in the Western Cape province of South Africa

dc.contributor.authorMarais B.J.
dc.contributor.authorVictor T.C.
dc.contributor.authorHesseling A.C.
dc.contributor.authorBarnard M.
dc.contributor.authorJordaan A.
dc.contributor.authorBrittle W.
dc.contributor.authorReuter H.
dc.contributor.authorBeyers N.
dc.contributor.authorVan Helden P.D.
dc.contributor.authorWarren R.M.
dc.contributor.authorSchaaf H.S.
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-15T16:16:55Z
dc.date.available2011-05-15T16:16:55Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Clinical Microbiology
dc.identifier.citation44
dc.identifier.citation10
dc.identifier.issn00951137
dc.identifier.other10.1128/JCM.01291-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/13993
dc.description.abstractDrug resistance among children with culture-confirmed tuberculosis (TB) provides an accurate measure of transmitted drug resistance within the community. We describe the genotype diversity in children with culture-confirmed TB and investigate the relationship between genotype and drug resistance. A prospective study was conducted from March 2003 through August 2005 at Tygerberg Children's Hospital, in the Western Cape Province of South Africa. All children (<13 years of age) diagnosed with culture-confirmed TB were included. Genotype analysis and phenotypic drug susceptibility testing were performed on the first culture-positive isolate from each patient. Mutation analysis was performed on all drug-resistant isolates. Spoligo-typing was successfully performed on isolates from 391/399 (98%) children diagnosed with culture-confirmed TB. Drug susceptibility testing was also performed on 391 isolates; 49 (12.5%) were resistant to isoniazid, and 20 (5.1%) of these were resistant to both isoniazid and rifampin. Beijing was the most common genotype family, identified in 130/391 (33.2%) cases, followed by LAM in 114/391 (29.2%) cases. The presence of both Beijing and Haarlem genotype families was significantly associated with drug resistance (26/49 [53.1%] versus 113/342 [33.0%]; odds ratio, 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.0 to 2.9). The high prevalence of Beijing and LAM in children with culture-confirmed TB reflects considerable transmission of these genotype families within the community. The overrepresentation of Beijing and Haarlem genotype families in children with drug-resistant TB demonstrates their contribution to transmitted drug resistance and their potential importance in the emergent drug-resistant TB epidemic. Copyright © 2006, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
dc.subjectisoniazid
dc.subjectrifampicin
dc.subjecttuberculostatic agent
dc.subjectantibiotic resistance
dc.subjectarticle
dc.subjectbacterial growth
dc.subjectbacterium contamination
dc.subjectbacterium culture
dc.subjectchild
dc.subjectcontrolled study
dc.subjectdrug sensitivity
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjectgene mutation
dc.subjectgenotype
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectinfant
dc.subjectmajor clinical study
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectmultidrug resistance
dc.subjectprevalence
dc.subjectpriority journal
dc.subjecttuberculosis
dc.subjectdrug effect
dc.subjectgenetics
dc.subjectMycobacterium tuberculosis
dc.subjectnewborn
dc.subjectpreschool child
dc.subjectSouth Africa
dc.subjectAntitubercular Agents
dc.subjectChild
dc.subjectChild, Preschool
dc.subjectDrug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectGenotype
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectInfant
dc.subjectInfant, Newborn
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMycobacterium tuberculosis
dc.subjectSouth Africa
dc.subjectTuberculosis
dc.titleBeijing and Haarlem genotypes are overrepresented among children with drug-resistant tuberculosis in the Western Cape province of South Africa
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionArticle


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