The development and modelling of high-intensity impinging stream jet reactors for effective mass transfer in heterogeneous systems

Kleingeld A.W. ; Lorenzen L. ; Botes F.G. (1999)

Article

A novel type of phase-contacting device has been researched and is currently being developed at this institution. These high-intensity jet reactors provide significant improvement over conventional phase-contacting equipment due to the impingement of high-velocity feed streams upon each other in relatively small reactor volumes, resulting in a highly turbulent mixing of phases. Due to this intimate contact between phases, mass transfer coefficients (k(L)) of up to 1.5 x 10-3 m/s have been realised, which, coupled with values of the specific interfacial area (a) of 8-18 000 m2/m3, have yielded volumetric mass transfer coefficients (k(L)a) of up to 22 s-1 which are orders of magnitude higher than typical values obtained by conventional systems. A model for the prediction of the interfacial area production in these new reactors has also been proposed. It is implemented in the form of a Monte Carlo simulation, based on the fact that bubble breakup in a turbulent environment is governed by the interactions of bubbles with turbulent eddies. Although the model is only a first attempt, it has proved to be highly practical and flexible, reasonably predicting trends in the experimental data.A novel type of phase-contacting device has been researched and is currently being developed at this institution. These high-intensity jet reactors provide significant improvement over conventional phase-contacting equipment due to the impingement of high-velocity feed streams upon each other in relatively small reactor volumes, resulting in a highly turbulent mixing of phases. Due to this intimate contact between phases, mass transfer coefficients (kL) of up to 1.5 × 10-3 m/s have been realised, which, coupled with values of the specific interfacial area (a) of 8-18 000 m2/m3, have yielded volumetric mass transfer coefficients (kLa) of up to 22 s-1 which are orders of magnitude higher than typical values obtained by conventional systems. A model for the prediction of the interfacial area production in these new reactors has also been proposed. It is implemented in the form of a Monte Carlo simulation, based on the fact that bubble breakup in a turbulent environment is governed by the interactions of bubbles with turbulent eddies. Although the model is only a first attempt, it has proved to be highly practical and flexible, reasonably predicting trends in the experimental data.

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