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Dietary and fluid adherence among haemodialysis patients attending public sector hospitals in the Western Cape

dc.contributor.authorFincham D.
dc.contributor.authorKagee A.
dc.contributor.authorMoosa M.R.
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-15T15:57:35Z
dc.date.available2011-05-15T15:57:35Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationSouth African Journal of Clinical Nutrition
dc.identifier.citation21
dc.identifier.citation2
dc.identifier.issn16070658
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/10488
dc.description.abstractObjective: There has been considerable debate about the extent to which social cognitive models of health behaviour apply in developing countries. The purpose of this paper was to determine the applicability of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) in predicting dietary and fluid adherence among a sample of haemodialysis patients attending public sector hospitals in the Western Cape. Design and methods: A sample of 62 historically disadvantaged patients undergoing haemodialysis completed a battery of psychometric instruments measuring attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control regarding dietary and fluid adherence, health literacy, perceived social support, and self-reported dietary and fluid adherence. Interdialytic weight gain (IDWG), predialytic serum potassium levels, and predialytic serum phosphate levels served as biochemical indicators of dietary and fluid adherence. Results: Regression analyses indicated that the linear combination of attitudes and perceived behavioural control significantly accounted for 15.5% of the variance in self-reported adherence (a medium-effect size) and 11.4% of the variance in IDWG (a modest-effect size). No significant predictors were identified for predialytic serum potassium and predialytic serum phosphate levels. Interpretation and conclusions: The results indicate that, while the TPB may not function in the same manner as it does in Western samples, it may have some nuanced applicability among haemodialysis patients attending public sector hospitals in the Western Cape.
dc.subjectphosphate
dc.subjectpotassium
dc.subjectadult
dc.subjectarticle
dc.subjectAsian
dc.subjectbehavior control
dc.subjectbiochemistry
dc.subjectCaucasian
dc.subjectcontrolled study
dc.subjectdeveloping country
dc.subjectdiabetes mellitus
dc.subjectdiet restriction
dc.subjecteducational status
dc.subjecteffect size
dc.subjectfamily size
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjectfluid intake
dc.subjectfood intake
dc.subjecthealth behavior
dc.subjecthemodialysis
dc.subjecthemodialysis patient
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjecthypertension
dc.subjectkidney failure
dc.subjectmajor clinical study
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectmarriage
dc.subjectNegro
dc.subjectpatient attitude
dc.subjectpatient compliance
dc.subjectphosphate blood level
dc.subjectpotassium blood level
dc.subjectprediction
dc.subjectpsychometry
dc.subjectpublic hospital
dc.subjectrace difference
dc.subjectself report
dc.subjectsocial support
dc.subjectSouth Africa
dc.subjectTheory of Planned Behavior
dc.subjectweight gain
dc.titleDietary and fluid adherence among haemodialysis patients attending public sector hospitals in the Western Cape
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionArticle


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