Dietary and fluid adherence among haemodialysis patients attending public sector hospitals in the Western Cape

SUNScholar Research Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Fincham D.
dc.contributor.author Kagee A.
dc.contributor.author Moosa M.R.
dc.date.accessioned 2011-05-15T15:57:35Z
dc.date.available 2011-05-15T15:57:35Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.citation South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition
dc.identifier.citation 21
dc.identifier.citation 2
dc.identifier.issn 16070658
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/10488
dc.description.abstract Objective: There has been considerable debate about the extent to which social cognitive models of health behaviour apply in developing countries. The purpose of this paper was to determine the applicability of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) in predicting dietary and fluid adherence among a sample of haemodialysis patients attending public sector hospitals in the Western Cape. Design and methods: A sample of 62 historically disadvantaged patients undergoing haemodialysis completed a battery of psychometric instruments measuring attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control regarding dietary and fluid adherence, health literacy, perceived social support, and self-reported dietary and fluid adherence. Interdialytic weight gain (IDWG), predialytic serum potassium levels, and predialytic serum phosphate levels served as biochemical indicators of dietary and fluid adherence. Results: Regression analyses indicated that the linear combination of attitudes and perceived behavioural control significantly accounted for 15.5% of the variance in self-reported adherence (a medium-effect size) and 11.4% of the variance in IDWG (a modest-effect size). No significant predictors were identified for predialytic serum potassium and predialytic serum phosphate levels. Interpretation and conclusions: The results indicate that, while the TPB may not function in the same manner as it does in Western samples, it may have some nuanced applicability among haemodialysis patients attending public sector hospitals in the Western Cape.
dc.subject phosphate
dc.subject potassium
dc.subject adult
dc.subject article
dc.subject Asian
dc.subject behavior control
dc.subject biochemistry
dc.subject Caucasian
dc.subject controlled study
dc.subject developing country
dc.subject diabetes mellitus
dc.subject diet restriction
dc.subject educational status
dc.subject effect size
dc.subject family size
dc.subject female
dc.subject fluid intake
dc.subject food intake
dc.subject health behavior
dc.subject hemodialysis
dc.subject hemodialysis patient
dc.subject human
dc.subject hypertension
dc.subject kidney failure
dc.subject major clinical study
dc.subject male
dc.subject marriage
dc.subject Negro
dc.subject patient attitude
dc.subject patient compliance
dc.subject phosphate blood level
dc.subject potassium blood level
dc.subject prediction
dc.subject psychometry
dc.subject public hospital
dc.subject race difference
dc.subject self report
dc.subject social support
dc.subject South Africa
dc.subject Theory of Planned Behavior
dc.subject weight gain
dc.title Dietary and fluid adherence among haemodialysis patients attending public sector hospitals in the Western Cape
dc.type Article
dc.description.version Article


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record