The prevalence and risk factors of symptoms of depression, anxiety and somatic syndromes among secondary school students in Kampala, Uganda

Nsereko, James Roger (2018-03)

Thesis (MPhil)--Stellenbosch University, 2018.

Thesis

ENGLISH SUMMARY: Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of symptoms of depression, anxiety and somatic syndromes and to examine the association of these conditions with socio-demographic factors (i.e. age, gender and family composition) in secondary school students in Kampala. Methods: Participants were selected from six schools, randomly drawn from Nakawa and Makindye division in Kampala, Uganda. The participants were 549 adolescents, aged 14-17 years. Participants completed a battery of measures including a socio-demographic questionnaire, Youth Self-Report (YSR) - DSM oriented scales for depression, anxiety and somatic syndromes. Descriptive, bivariate and multivariate analysis were used to determine the prevalence of depression, anxiety and somatic syndromes and associations between these syndromes and demographic variables. Results: Prevalence of symptoms of depression was 21.1% (95% CI 17.8% -24.6%), anxiety was 38.5% (95% CI 34.9% - 42.6%) and somatic syndromes was 42% (95% CI 37.8% - 45.9%). There was a high comorbidity among conditions under study, with 31.4% of respondents meeting the criteria for at least two conditions. Symptoms of depression were significantly associated with gender, religion, and living arrangement. Symptoms of anxiety were only associated with gender, whereas somatic syndromes were significantly associated with gender, and living arrangement. Conclusion: Symptoms of depression, anxiety and somatic syndromes were prevalent among adolescents in schools in this study. Findings indicate that girls were more at risk of developing symptoms of depression, anxiety and somatic syndromes than boys. Furthermore adolescents not living with their biological parents were more vulnerable to depression and somatic syndromes than those living with both parents. These findings highlight the need to put in place mechanisms for monitoring and addressing psychological problems in schools.

AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Geen opsomming beskikbaar

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