Epidemiology of lower respiratory infection and pneumonia in South Africa (1997 – 2015) : a systematic review protocol

Roomaney, Rifqah A. ; Pillay-van Wyk, Victoria ; Awotiwon, Oluwatoyin F. ; Dhansay, Ali ; Groenewald, Pam ; Joubert, Jane D. ; Nglazi, Mweete D. ; Nicol, Edward ; Bradshaw, Debbie (2016)

CITATION: Roomaney, R. A., et al. 2016. Epidemiology of lower respiratory infection and pneumonia in South Africa (1997 – 2015) : a systematic review protocol. BMJ Open, 6:e012154, doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012154.

The original publication is available at http://bmjopen.bmj.com

Article

Introduction: Lower respiratory infections (LRIs) and pneumonia are among the leading causes of death worldwide, especially in children aged under 5 years, and these patterns are reflected in the South African population. Local epidemiological data for LRIs and pneumonia are required to inform the Second National Burden of Disease Study underway in South Africa. The aim of this systematic review is to identify published studies reporting the prevalence, incidence, case fatality, duration or severity of LRI and pneumonia in adults and children in South Africa. Methods and analysis: Electronic database searches will be conducted to obtain studies reporting on the prevalence, incidence, case fatality, duration and severity of LRI and pneumonia in South Africa between January 1997 and December 2015. Studies that are assessed to have moderate or low risk of bias will be included in a meta-analysis, if appropriate. Where meta-analysis is not possible, the articles will be described narratively. Subgroup analysis (eg, age groups) will also be conducted where enough information is available. Ethics and dissemination: This systematic review will only include published data with no linked patientlevel information; thus, no ethics approval is required. The findings will be used to calculate the burden of disease attributed to LRI and pneumonia in South Africa and will highlight the type of epidemiological data available in the country. The article will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed publication.

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