The role of HIV/AIDS disability grants in influencing people living with HIV to adhere to antiretroviral therapy with specific reference to the South African Red Cross Society in Nyanga

Ndlumbini, Ntombencane Margaret (2009-03)

Thesis (MPhil. (Industrial Psychology))--University of Stellenbosch, 2009.

Thesis

ENGLISH ABSTRACT: The first cases of HIV in South Africa were diagnosed in the early 1980s, but HIV did not become widespread in the general population until the early 1990s. Since 1994, the country has experienced an exponential rise in the number of HIV infections, AIDS diagnoses and HIV–related deaths. In 2005, an estimated 5,5 million people in South Africa were living with HIV, and an estimated 571 000 new infections occurred among persons 2 years and older. In recent years HIV prevalence has stabilized as the high number of new HIV infections has been offset by a high number of HIV-related deaths. The first national estimates of HIV incidence, published early in 2008, will serve a benchmark for monitoring future trends. Social factors such as stigma, poverty, unemployment, gender inequality, migrant labour, and sexual violence are important drivers of the HIV epidemic in South Africa. This study is a small-scale study to investigate the role of HIV disability grants in influencing people living with HIV and AIDS to adhere to antiretroviral therapy, with specific reference to the South African Red Cross Society in Nyanga. The primary objective of this study is twofold: (i) To determine the role of social grants in ARV adherence by people living with HIV and AIDS. (ii) To investigate whether people living with HIV and AIDS and using their grants are living a good healthy lifestyle.

Please refer to this item in SUNScholar by using the following persistent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/1014
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