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Mycobacterium fortuitum as infectious agent in a septic total knee replacement : case study and literature review

dc.contributor.authorVenter, R. G.en_ZA
dc.contributor.authorSolomon, C.en_ZA
dc.contributor.authorBaartman, M.en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-24T09:16:37Z
dc.date.available2016-08-24T09:16:37Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationVenter, R. G., Solomon, C. & Baartman, M. 2015. Mycobacterium fortuitum as infectious agent in a septic total knee replacement : case study and literature review. South African Orthopaedic Journal, 14(2):52-56, doi:10.17159/2309-8309.
dc.identifier.issn2309-8309 (online)
dc.identifier.issn1681-150X (print)
dc.identifier.otherdoi:10.17159/2309-8309
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/99457
dc.descriptionCITATION: Venter, R. G., Solomon, C. & Baartman, M. 2015. Mycobacterium fortuitum as infectious agent in a septic total knee replacement : case study and literature review. South African Orthopaedic Journal, 14(2):52-56, doi:10.17159/2309-8309.
dc.descriptionThe original publication is available at http://www.scielo.org.za
dc.description.abstractInfection of prosthetic joints with non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is rare. The rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) are a subgroup of NTM. They are not very virulent organisms, found ubiquitously in the environment, and most infections in humans are due to direct inoculation of the organism into a joint or soft tissue. We describe a 70-year-old patient, who developed an infection with Mycobacterium fortuitum after primary knee arthroplasty, one of only a handful described in the literature. Peri-prosthetic infections with RGM are a challenge because there is a lack of data guiding management, and because the diagnosis is often delayed. Routine cultures of joint effusions or tissue are often discarded before the non-tuberculous mycobacteria have a chance to culture (in our case, 14 days). Principles of treatment include: making a diagnosis from tissue culture, staged revision surgery with aggressive surgical debridement of the joint and high dosages antibiotics (for at least six weeks, treating empirically initially until a sensitivity profile for the organism is available). The second stage of the revision should be delayed by 3-6 months. In our case the removed implant was autoclaved and re-implanted loosely with antibiotic-loaded cement as part of the first-stage revision.en_ZA
dc.description.abstractAFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Geen opsomming beskikbaaraf_ZA
dc.description.urihttp://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_abstract&pid=S1681-150X2015000200009&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en
dc.format.extent5 pages : illustrationsen_ZA
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_ZA
dc.publisherChampagne Mediaen_ZA
dc.subjectTotal knee replacementen_ZA
dc.subjectProsthetic joints -- infectionen_ZA
dc.subjectSeptic arthritisen_ZA
dc.subjectMycobacterial infectionsen_ZA
dc.titleMycobacterium fortuitum as infectious agent in a septic total knee replacement : case study and literature reviewen_ZA
dc.typeArticleen_ZA
dc.description.versionPublisher's version
dc.rights.holderSouth African Orthopaedic Associationen_ZA


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