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History, memory and reconciliation : Njabulo Ndebele’s The cry of Winnie Mandela and Pumla Gobodo- Madikizela’s A human being died that night

dc.contributor.authorGoodman, Ralphen_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-26T12:03:21Z
dc.date.available2015-03-26T12:03:21Z
dc.date.issued2006-08
dc.identifier.citationGoodman, R. 2006. History, memory and reconciliation : Njabulo Ndebele’s The cry of Winnie Mandela and Pumla Gobodo- Madikizela’s A human being died that night. Literator, 1-20, doi: 10.4102/lit.v27i2.190en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn2219-8237 (online)
dc.identifier.issn0258-2279 (print)
dc.identifier.otherdoi: 10.4102/lit.v27i2.190
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/96420
dc.descriptionCITATION: Goodman, R. 2006. History, memory and reconciliation : Njabulo Ndebele’s The cry of Winnie Mandela and Pumla Gobodo- Madikizela’s A human being died that night. Literator, 1-20, doi: 10.4102/lit.v27i2.190.en_ZA
dc.descriptionThe original publication is available at http://literator.org.zaen_ZA
dc.description.abstractThis article deals with two texts written during the process of transition in South Africa, using them to explore the cultural and ethical complexity of that process. Both Njabulo Ndebele’s “The cry of Winnie Mandela” and Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela’s “A human being died that night” deal with controversial public figures, Winnie Mandela and Eugene de Kock respectively, whose role in South African history has made them part of the national iconography. Ndebele and Gobodo-Madikizela employ narrative techniques that expose and exploit faultlines in the popular representations of these figures. The two texts offer radical ways of understanding the communal and individual suffering caused by apartheid, challenging readers to respond to the past in ways that will promote healing rather than perpetuate a spirit of revenge. The part played by official histories is implicitly questioned and the role of individual stories is shown to be crucial. Forgiveness and reconciliation are seen as dependent on an awareness of the complex circumstances and the humanity of those who are labelled as offenders. This requirement applies especially to the case of “A human being died that night”, a text that insists that the overt acknowledgement of the humanity of people like Eugene de Kock is an important way of healing South African society.en_ZA
dc.description.urihttp://www.literator.org.za/index.php/literator/article/view/190
dc.format.extent20 pagesen_ZA
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_ZA
dc.publisherAOSIS Publishingen_ZA
dc.subjectNdebele, Njabulo S. (Njabulo Simakahle). The cry of Winnie Mandela -- Criticism and interpretationen_ZA
dc.subjectGobodo-Madikizela, Pumla. A human being died that night -- Criticism and interpretationen_ZA
dc.subjectDe Kock, Eugeneen_ZA
dc.subjectMandela, Winnieen_ZA
dc.subjectReconciliation -- Political aspects -- South Africaen_ZA
dc.titleHistory, memory and reconciliation : Njabulo Ndebele’s The cry of Winnie Mandela and Pumla Gobodo- Madikizela’s A human being died that nighten_ZA
dc.typeArticleen_ZA
dc.description.versionPublisher's versionen_ZA
dc.rights.holderAuthors retain copyrighten_ZA


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