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Improving the cost-effectiveness of artificial visual baits for controlling the tsetse fly glossina fuscipes fuscipes

dc.contributor.authorLindh, Jenny M.en_ZA
dc.contributor.authorTorr, Steve J.en_ZA
dc.contributor.authorVale, Glyn A.en_ZA
dc.contributor.authorLehane, Mike J.en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-21T14:42:21Z
dc.date.available2013-02-21T14:42:21Z
dc.date.issued2009-07
dc.identifier.citationLindh, J. M., et al. 2009. Improving the cost-effectiveness of artificial visual baits for controlling the tsetse fly glossina fuscipes fuscipes. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 3(7): 1-7, doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0000474
dc.identifier.issn1935-2735 (online)
dc.identifier.issn1935-2727 (print)
dc.identifier.otherdoi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0000474
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/79594
dc.descriptionCITATION: Lindh, J. M., et al. 2009. Improving the cost-effectiveness of artificial visual baits for controlling the tsetse fly glossina fuscipes fuscipes. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 3(7): 1-7, doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0000474.
dc.descriptionThe original publication is available at http://journals.plos.org/plosntds
dc.description.abstractTsetse flies, which transmit sleeping sickness to humans and nagana to cattle, are commonly controlled by stationary artificial baits consisting of traps or insecticide-treated screens known as targets. In Kenya the use of electrocuting sampling devices showed that the numbers of Glossina fuscipes fuscipes (Newstead) visiting a biconical trap were nearly double those visiting a black target of 100 cm6100 cm. However, only 40% of the males and 21% of the females entered the trap, whereas 71% and 34%, respectively, alighted on the target. The greater number visiting the trap appeared to be due to its being largely blue, rather than being three-dimensional or raised above the ground. Through a series of variations of target design we show that a blue-and-black panel of cloth (0.06 m2) flanked by a panel (0.06 m2) of fine black netting, placed at ground level, would be about ten times more cost-effective than traps or large targets in control campaigns. This finding has important implications for controlling all subspecies of G. fuscipes, which are currently responsible for more than 90% of sleeping sickness cases.en_ZA
dc.description.sponsorshipBill and Melinda Gates Foundation & European Commission INCO programen_ZA
dc.format.extent7 pagesen_ZA
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_ZA
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_ZA
dc.subjectTsetse-fliesen_ZA
dc.subjectSleeping sicknessen_ZA
dc.subjectGlossina fuscipes fuscipesen_ZA
dc.subjectNaganaen_ZA
dc.subjectPest control baitsen_ZA
dc.titleImproving the cost-effectiveness of artificial visual baits for controlling the tsetse fly glossina fuscipes fuscipesen_ZA
dc.typeArticleen_ZA
dc.description.versionPublisher's versionen_ZA
dc.rights.holderAuthors retain copyrighten_ZA


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