Playing with peace : Solomon as the man of peace and rest, and the temple as the house of rest

Jonker, Louis C. (2021)

CITATION: Jonker, L. C. 2021. Playing with peace : Solomon as the man of peace and rest, and the temple as the house of rest. Religions, 13:2, doi:10.3390/rel13010002.

The original publication is available at https://www.mdpi.com/2077-1444/13/1/2

Article

It is well‑known that the notions of peace, rest and order belonged to the royal Achaemenid ideology, particularly from the time of Darius I onwards. This can be witnessed in Achaemenid ar‑ chitecture, iconography and royal inscriptions. However, although the relations between the Persian Empire and the Greek city‑states were never completely peaceful, the diplomatic relations between Persia and particularly Sparta emphasised the value and importance of peace for international pol‑ itics. How did this international discourse influence the literature formation in Yehud at the same time? In addition, can one read the Chronicler’s portrayal of King Solomon of old as playful (and un‑ dermining) irony and polemic against the imperial masters? In this article, I revisit an earlier study in which I have started investigating the rhetorical locus of the Chronicler’s portrayal of this king.

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