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Behaviour profiles after tuberculous meningitis

dc.contributor.authorWait J.W.
dc.contributor.authorSchoeman J.F.
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-15T16:02:03Z
dc.date.available2011-05-15T16:02:03Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Tropical Pediatrics
dc.identifier.citation56
dc.identifier.citation3
dc.identifier.issn1426338
dc.identifier.other10.1093/tropej/fmp080
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/12283
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the study was to investigate child behaviour in children who recovered from tuberculous meningitis (TBM) and to compare behaviour profiles of stage II and stage III patients. The mean age of the cohort of 74 children at the time of evaluation was 10 years and 7 months. At follow-up all patients underwent a thorough neurological examination and a psychometric test battery, which included intellectual assessment and evaluation of behaviour by means of the CBCL/6-18. Results indicated elevated mean scores (T > 60) on CBCL/6-18 scales which measure problems with anxiety, depression, attention, social relationships, disruptive and rule-breaking behaviour. Mean CBCL scores of stage III patients were significantly higher than the mean scores of stage II patients on scales which measure social problems, disruptive and rule-breaking behaviour. In addition, problems with conduct, attention, attention-deficit/hyperactivity problems, affective problems as well as the total problem scores were more pronounced in the patients with stage III TBM. We conclude that general behavioural disinhibitions as well as internalized emotional disorder probably are long-term complications in more than 10%; of the survivors of TBM. © The Author [2009]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.
dc.subjectaffect
dc.subjectanxiety disorder
dc.subjectarticle
dc.subjectattention
dc.subjectattention deficit disorder
dc.subjectattention disturbance
dc.subjectchild
dc.subjectchild behavior
dc.subjectcohort analysis
dc.subjectconduct disorder
dc.subjectdepression
dc.subjectdisruptive behavior
dc.subjectemotional disorder
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjectfollow up
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectintellect
dc.subjectmajor clinical study
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectpsychometry
dc.subjectsocial aspect
dc.subjecttuberculous meningitis
dc.subjectadolescent
dc.subjectbehavior disorder
dc.subjectclassification
dc.subjecthospitalization
dc.subjectinfant
dc.subjectmental disease
dc.subjectpreschool child
dc.subjectpsychological aspect
dc.subjectquestionnaire
dc.subjectsocial behavior
dc.subjectsocioeconomics
dc.subjectsurvivor
dc.subjecttreatment outcome
dc.subjecttuberculostatic agent
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectAntitubercular Agents
dc.subjectChild
dc.subjectChild Behavior Disorders
dc.subjectChild, Preschool
dc.subjectCohort Studies
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectFollow-Up Studies
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectInfant
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMental Disorders
dc.subjectQuestionnaires
dc.subjectSeverity of Illness Index
dc.subjectSocial Behavior
dc.subjectSocioeconomic Factors
dc.subjectSurvivors
dc.subjectTreatment Outcome
dc.subjectTuberculosis, Meningeal
dc.titleBehaviour profiles after tuberculous meningitis
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionArticle


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