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Indigenous and faith healing for mental health in Ghana : an examination of the literature on reported beliefs, practices and use of alternative mental health care in Ghana

dc.contributor.authorKpobi, Lilyen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorSwartz, Leslieen_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-05T10:16:12Z
dc.date.available2020-02-05T10:16:12Z
dc.date.issued2019-07-15
dc.identifier.citationKpobi, L. & Swartz, L. 2019. Indigenous and faith healing for mental health in Ghana : an examination of the literature on reported beliefs, practices and use of alternative mental health care in Ghana. African Journal of Primary Health Care and Family Medicine, 11(1):a1941, doi:10.4102/phcfm.v11i1.1941
dc.identifier.issn2071-2936 (online)
dc.identifier.issn2071-2928 (print)
dc.identifier.otherdoi:10.4102/phcfm.v11i1.1941
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/107435
dc.descriptionCITATION: Kpobi, L. & Swartz, L. 2019. Indigenous and faith healing for mental health in Ghana : an examination of the literature on reported beliefs, practices and use of alternative mental health care in Ghana. African Journal of Primary Health Care and Family Medicine, 11(1):a1941, doi:10.4102/phcfm.v11i1.1941.
dc.descriptionThe original publication is available at https://phcfm.org/index.php/phcfm
dc.descriptionPublication of this article was funded by the Stellenbosch University Open Access Fund.
dc.description.abstractBackground: For many people in African countries, various forms of health care are utilised for the treatment of illness. This pluralistic nature of health seeking includes the use of indigenous, faith and allopathic medicines for care. Aim: In this article, our aim was to gain insight into the existing knowledge on indigenous and faith healing in Ghana, with a particular focus on mental health care. We first examine the reported mental health beliefs and practices of Ghanaian alternative healers. Following this, we look at the use and purported preference for non-biomedical mental health care by patients. Methods: Relevant literature was examined to explore the beliefs, practices and use of non-biomedical mental health care systems in Ghana Results: Evidence for the use and preference for non-biomedical mental health care is largely anecdotal. Similarly, the mental health beliefs of alternative healers have been documented in various small-scale studies. However, such information is important if mental health services in Ghana are to be improved. Conclusion: Integration of the different healthcare systems must be built on knowledge of beliefs and methods. A clearer understanding of the work of non-biomedical healers is important if appropriate recommendations are to be made for collaboration between biomedical and non-biomedical systems in Ghana.en_ZA
dc.description.urihttps://phcfm.org/index.php/phcfm/article/view/1941
dc.format.extent5 pagesen_ZA
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_ZA
dc.publisherAOSISen_ZA
dc.subjectMental healthen_ZA
dc.subjectTraditional healersen_ZA
dc.subjectFaith healers -- Ghanaen_ZA
dc.titleIndigenous and faith healing for mental health in Ghana : an examination of the literature on reported beliefs, practices and use of alternative mental health care in Ghanaen_ZA
dc.typeArticleen_ZA
dc.description.versionPublisher's version
dc.rights.holderAuthors retain copyrighten_ZA


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