From surviving to thriving : What evidence is needed to move early child-development interventions to scale?

Tomlinson, Mark (2018)

CITATION: Tomlinson, M. 2018. From surviving to thriving : What evidence is needed to move early child-development interventions to scale?. PLoS Medicine, 15(4):e1002557, doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1002557.

The original publication is available at https://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine

Article

ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Previous research has established that delivering interventions in the first 1,000 days of life improves mother–child attachment [1], contributes to the reduction of health inequities [2], has a significant impact on adult health [3], and is cost-effective [4]. At the global level, the importance of the early years of a child’s life is reflected in high-level World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) support [5], the Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health (with its focus on not only survival but also children’s ability to thrive and progress successfully into adolescence) [6], and the Nurturing Care Framework to be launched at the WHO World Health Assembly in May 2018. In this week's PLOS Medicine, 2 Research Articles present findings from trials conducted in Zambia and Colombia that add to the burgeoning evidence base on the implementation of early interventions designed to improve early child development (ECD) in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).

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