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Competition between silicifiers and non-silicifiers in the past and present ocean and its evolutionary impacts

dc.contributor.authorHendry, Katharine R.en_ZA
dc.contributor.authorMarron, Alan O.en_ZA
dc.contributor.authorVincent, Floraen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorConley, Daniel J.en_ZA
dc.contributor.authorGehlen, Marionen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorIbarbalz, Federico M.en_ZA
dc.contributor.authorQueguiner, Bernarden_ZA
dc.contributor.authorBowler, Chrisen_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-26T13:02:08Z
dc.date.available2019-09-26T13:02:08Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationHendry, K. R., et al. 2018. Competition between silicifiers and non-silicifiers in the past and present ocean and its evolutionary impacts. Frontiers in Marine Science, 5:22, doi:10.3389/fmars.2018.00022
dc.identifier.issn2296-7745 (online)
dc.identifier.otherdoi:10.3389/fmars.2018.00022
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/106528
dc.descriptionCITATION: Hendry, K. R., et al. 2018. Competition between silicifiers and non-silicifiers in the past and present ocean and its evolutionary impacts. Frontiers in Marine Science, 5:22, doi:10.3389/fmars.2018.00022.
dc.descriptionThe original publication is available at https://www.frontiersin.org
dc.description.abstractCompetition is a central part of the evolutionary process, and silicification is no exception: between biomineralized and non-biomineralized organisms, between siliceous and non-siliceous biomineralizing organisms, and between different silicifying groups. Here we discuss evolutionary competition at various scales, and how this has affected biogeochemical cycles of silicon, carbon, and other nutrients. Across geological time we examine how fossils, sediments, and isotopic geochemistry can provide evidence for the emergence and expansion of silica biomineralization in the ocean, and competition between silicifying organisms for silicic acid. Metagenomic data from marine environments can be used to illustrate evolutionary competition between groups of silicifying and non-silicifying marine organisms. Modern ecosystems also provide examples of arms races between silicifiers as predators and prey, and how silicification can be used to provide a competitive advantage for obtaining resources. Through studying the molecular biology of silicifying and non-silicifying species we can relate how they have responded to the competitive interactions that are observed, and how solutions have evolved through convergent evolutionary dynamics.en_ZA
dc.description.urihttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2018.00022/full
dc.format.extent21 pages
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_ZA
dc.publisherFrontiers Media
dc.subjectSilicifiersen_ZA
dc.subjectEvolution (Biology)en_ZA
dc.subjectCompetition (Biology)en_ZA
dc.subjectBiomineralizationen_ZA
dc.subjectMarine organisms -- Evolutionen_ZA
dc.subjectPredation (Biology) -- Molecular aspectsen_ZA
dc.titleCompetition between silicifiers and non-silicifiers in the past and present ocean and its evolutionary impactsen_ZA
dc.typeArticleen_ZA
dc.description.versionPublisher's version
dc.rights.holderAuthors retain copyright


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