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The behavior and reproductive physiology of a solitary progressive provisioning vespid wasp : evidence for a solitary-cycle origin of reproductive castes

dc.contributor.authorKelstrup, Hans C.en_ZA
dc.contributor.authorHartfelder, Klausen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorLopes, Tiago Falconen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorWossler, Theresa C.en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-02T08:03:38Z
dc.date.available2019-09-02T08:03:38Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-05
dc.identifier.citationKelstrup, H. C., et al. 2018. The behavior and reproductive physiology of a solitary progressive provisioning vespid wasp : evidence for a solitary-cycle origin of reproductive castes. American Naturalist, 191(2):E27–E39, doi:10.1086/695336en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn1537-5323 (online)
dc.identifier.issn0003-0147 (print)
dc.identifier.otherdoi:10.1086/695336
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/106412
dc.descriptionCITATION: Kelstrup, H. C., et al. 2018. The behavior and reproductive physiology of a solitary progressive provisioning vespid wasp : evidence for a solitary-cycle origin of reproductive castes. American Naturalist, 191(2):E27–E39, doi:10.1086/695336.en_ZA
dc.descriptionThe original publication is available at https://www.journals.uchicago.eduen_ZA
dc.description.abstractThe emergence of queens and workers from solitary antecedents mark a major evolutionary transition in the history of life. The solitary progressive provisioning wasp Synagris cornuta, a member of the subfamily Eumeninae (basal to eusocial vespid wasps), alternates between behavioral states characterized as queenlike and worker-like. Akin to a queen in eusocial wasps, a S. cornuta female initiates construction of a cell into which she oviposits and then, similar to a worker, cares for the brood as it develops. The ovarian groundplan (OGP) hypothesis for caste origins predicts that these behavioral states are associated with cyclical changes in ovarian status, where females performing queenlike tasks have eggs and those performing worker-like tasks possess only small oocytes. Our findings show strong support for the OGP hypothesis: the ovaries of S. cornuta females undergo differential oogenesis depending on the behavioral phase: the largest oocyte in the ovaries of females building a cell progresses faster compared to that of females attending brood. Yet contrary to the OGP hypothesis, neither juvenile hormone nor ecdysteroids is associated with the reproductive cycle. Finally, the cuticular hydrocarbon profile showed no link with ovarian status, suggesting that fertility signals evolved subsequent to the emergence of group living.en_ZA
dc.description.urihttps://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/full/10.1086/695336
dc.format.extent13 pages : illustrationsen_ZA
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_ZA
dc.publisherUniversity of Chicago Pressen_ZA
dc.subjectEcdysteroidsen_ZA
dc.subjectSynagris cornuta (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Eumeninae) -- Reproductionen_ZA
dc.subjectOvarian groundplan hypothesisen_ZA
dc.subjectReproductive groundplan hypothesisen_ZA
dc.titleThe behavior and reproductive physiology of a solitary progressive provisioning vespid wasp : evidence for a solitary-cycle origin of reproductive castesen_ZA
dc.typeArticleen_ZA
dc.description.versionPublisher's versionen_ZA
dc.rights.holderThe University of Chicagoen_ZA


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