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Maternal colonization or infection with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Africa : a systematic review and meta-analysis

dc.contributor.authorBulabula, Andre N.H.en_ZA
dc.contributor.authorDramowski, Angelaen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorMehtar, Shaheenen_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-13T09:45:03Z
dc.date.available2018-09-13T09:45:03Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationBulabula, A. N. H., Dramowski, A. & Mehtar, S. 2017. Maternal colonization or infection with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Africa : a systematic review and meta-analysis. International Journal of Infectious Diseases, 64:58–66, doi:10.1016/j.ijid.2017.08.015
dc.identifier.issn1878-3511 (online)
dc.identifier.issn1201-9712 (print)
dc.identifier.otherdoi:10.1016/j.ijid.2017.08.015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/104423
dc.descriptionCITATION: Bulabula, A. N. H., Dramowski, A. & Mehtar, S. 2017. Maternal colonization or infection with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Africa : a systematic review and meta-analysis. International Journal of Infectious Diseases, 64:58–66, doi:10.1016/j.ijid.2017.08.015.
dc.descriptionThe original publication is available at https://www.ijidonline.com
dc.description.abstractObjective: To summarize published studies on the prevalence of and risk factors for maternal bacterial colonization and/or infection with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) in pregnant and/or post-partum women in Africa. Methods: A systematic review was conducted using the PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases. Bibliographies of included eligible studies were manually searched to identify additional relevant articles. No language restriction was applied. The timeframe of the search included all records from electronic database inception to July 15, 2017. A random-effects meta-analysis was performed to summarize the prevalence and the 95% confidence intervals (CI) of ESBL-E colonization or infection in pregnant or post-partum women in Africa. The meta-analysis was conducted using STATA IC 13.1 software and the metaprop function/plugin. Results: Ten studies (seven on pregnant women and three on post-partum women) were included, documenting a 17% prevalence of maternal colonization with ESBL-E in Africa (95% CI 10–23%). The prevalence of ESBL-E in community isolates exceeded that in isolates from the hospital setting (22% vs. 14%). The most frequently reported ESBL-encoding gene was CTX-M (cefotaxime hydrolyzing capabilities). Data on risk factors for maternal ESBL-E colonization and infection are very limited. Conclusions: The prevalence of colonization and/or infection with ESBL-E in pregnant and post-partum women in Africa exceeds that reported from high- and middle-income settings, representing a risk for subsequent neonatal colonization and/or infection with ESBL-E.en_ZA
dc.description.urihttps://www.ijidonline.com/article/S1201-9712(17)30221-7/abstract
dc.format.extent9 pages
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_ZA
dc.publisherPublished by Elsevier on behalf of International Society for Infectious Diseases
dc.subjectEnterobacteriaceaeen_ZA
dc.subjectPregnant womenen_ZA
dc.subjectPregnancy--Complicationsen_ZA
dc.titleMaternal colonization or infection with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Africa : a systematic review and meta-analysisen_ZA
dc.typeArticleen_ZA
dc.description.versionPublisher's version
dc.rights.holderAuthors retain copyright


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