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Comparative analysis of solar pasteurization versus solar disinfection for the treatment of harvested rainwater

dc.contributor.authorStrauss, Andreen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorDobrowsky, Penelope Heatheren_ZA
dc.contributor.authorNdlovu, Thandoen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorReyneke, Brandonen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorKhan, Wesaalen_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-17T12:31:27Z
dc.date.available2017-01-17T12:31:27Z
dc.date.issued2016-12-09
dc.identifier.citationStrauss, A., et al. 2016. Comparative analysis of solar pasteurization versus solar disinfection for the treatment of harvested rainwater. BMC Microbiology, 16:289, doi:10.1186/s12866-016-0909-yen_ZA
dc.identifier.issn1471-2180 (online)
dc.identifier.otherdoi:10.1186/s12866-016-0909-y
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/100473
dc.descriptionCITATION: Strauss, A., et al. 2016. Comparative analysis of solar pasteurization versus solar disinfection for the treatment of harvested rainwater. BMC Microbiology, 16:289, doi:10.1186/s12866-016-0909-y.en_ZA
dc.descriptionThe original publication is available at http://bmcmicrobiol.biomedcentral.comen_ZA
dc.description.abstractBackground: Numerous pathogens and opportunistic pathogens have been detected in harvested rainwater. Developing countries, in particular, require time- and cost-effective treatment strategies to improve the quality of this water source. The primary aim of the current study was thus to compare solar pasteurization (SOPAS; 70 to 79 °C; 80 to 89 °C; and ≥90 °C) to solar disinfection (SODIS; 6 and 8 hrs) for their efficiency in reducing the level of microbial contamination in harvested rainwater. The chemical quality (anions and cations) of the SOPAS and SODIS treated and untreated rainwater samples were also monitored. Results: While the anion concentrations in all the samples were within drinking water guidelines, the concentrations of lead (Pb) and nickel (Ni) exceeded the guidelines in all the SOPAS samples. Additionally, the iron (Fe) concentrations in both the SODIS 6 and 8 hr samples were above the drinking water guidelines. A >99% reduction in Escherichia coli and heterotrophic bacteria counts was then obtained in the SOPAS and SODIS samples. Ethidium monoazide bromide quantitative polymerase chain reaction (EMA-qPCR) analysis revealed a 94.70% reduction in viable Legionella copy numbers in the SOPAS samples, while SODIS after 6 and 8 hrs yielded a 50.60% and 75.22% decrease, respectively. Similarly, a 99.61% reduction in viable Pseudomonas copy numbers was observed after SOPAS treatment, while SODIS after 6 and 8 hrs yielded a 47.27% and 58.31% decrease, respectively. Conclusion: While both the SOPAS and SODIS systems reduced the indicator counts to below the detection limit, EMA-qPCR analysis indicated that SOPAS treatment yielded a 2- and 3-log reduction in viable Legionella and Pseudomonas copy numbers, respectively. Additionally, SODIS after 8 hrs yielded a 2-log and 1-log reduction in Legionella and Pseudomonas copy numbers, respectively and could be considered as an alternative, cost-effective treatment method for harvested rainwater.en_ZA
dc.description.urihttp://bmcmicrobiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12866-016-0909-y
dc.format.extent16 pages : illustrationsen_ZA
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_ZA
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_ZA
dc.subjectSolar pasteurizationen_ZA
dc.subjectSolar disinfectionen_ZA
dc.subjectHarvested rainwateren_ZA
dc.subjectMicrobial contaminationen_ZA
dc.titleComparative analysis of solar pasteurization versus solar disinfection for the treatment of harvested rainwateren_ZA
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2016-12-09T17:03:19Z
dc.description.versionPublisher's versionen_ZA
dc.rights.holderAuthors retain copyrighten_ZA


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