Necrotising enterocolitis as an infectious disease : evidence from an outbreak of invasive disease due to extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae [2]

Cotton, M. F. ; Pieper, C. H. ; Kirsten, G. F. ; Orth, H. ; Theron, D. C. (2001)

CITATION: Cotton, M. F. 2001. Necrotising enterocolitis as an infectious disease : evidence from an outbreak of invasive disease due to extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae [2]. South African Medical Journal, 91(2):133-135.

The original publication is available at http://www.samj.org.za

Article

Necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) is a severe gastro-intestinal disorder, predominantly seen in hospitalised low-birth-weight newborn infants. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Infants with NEC require parenteral nutrition and intravenous antibiotics with prolongation of hospitalisation. Severe cases require surgical resection of necrotic bowel wall with the attendant problems of the short gut syndrome.' NEC places an enormous burden on resource-poor institutions.

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