An analysis and assessment of the strategic architecture of a capita selecta of international business schools

De Jager, Leon (2011-12)

Thesis (MBA)--Stellenbosch University, 2011.

Thesis

The demand for business schools has risen worldwide over the last decade as new and emerging challenges confront the competitive business landscape. It is estimated that there are currently over 700 registered business schools around the globe. Potential students, therefore, have a wider choice between business schools especially since more business schools have internationalised their curricula. Business school reputation, amongst others, is still regarded as the single most important criterion of choice for students in their endeavours to obtain an international business qualification. This study analyses and assesses the strategic architecture of a capita selecta of international business schools. It also summarises the significant similarities and differences between the strategic architecture of the schools assessed. The research question can be stated as follows: What can be learnt from the strategic architecture of a Capita Selecta of international business schools? A related question is: What are the similarities and differences between the strategic architecture of these schools? This study focuses on a qualitative methodological approach and is done from a functionalist research paradigm. An encompassing literature review was undertaken during which different accreditation vehicles and the importance of an organisation’s strategic architecture in ensuring its competitive advantage and profitability are discussed and argued The empirical investigation is aimed at analysing and assessing the strategic architecture of five (5) international business schools. The case study is used as investigative instruments. The research findings have shown that accreditation alone, although very important, is not the main differentiator and source of competitive advantage. Schools employ various strategies to ensure their relevance and competitiveness.

Please refer to this item in SUNScholar by using the following persistent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/21374
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