Outcome of children treated for cancer in the republic of Namibia

Wessels G. ; Hesseling P.B. (1996)

Article

The data of a survey undertaken to record all cases of childhood cancer in Namibia from 1983 to 1988 were analyzed to estimate 5-year survival rates. The projected survival rate for 150 children with cancer was 37% with no difference between boys and girls. The calculated survival rates for most of the tumor groups were poor with the exception of Wilms' tumor which had a 5- year survival rate of 76%. The zero survival rate of children with malignant bone disease may have been due to inadequate treatment. Neuroblastoma and retinoblastoma presented with advanced disease which contributed to the poor survival rates of 13%, and 46%, respectively. The overall survival rate for lymphoma of 53% and 39% for all leukemias compares poorly with the rates obtained in industrialized countries. The relatively poor 25% survival rate in tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) may partly be due to the long delay between the initial diagnosis and the institution of appropriate treatment for raised intracranial pressure and for the tumor. Both cure and long term follow-up are difficult to achieve in a developing country. Improved early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are necessary to improve survival rates.The data of a survey undertaken to record all cases of childhood cancer in Namibia from 1983 to 1988 were analyzed to estimate 5-year survival rates. The projected survival rate for 150 children with cancer was 37%, with no difference between boys and girls. The calculated survival rates for most of the tumor groups were poor with the exception of Wilms' tumor which had a 5-year survival rate of 76%. The zero survival rate of children with malignant bone disease may have been due to inadequate treatment. Neuroblastoma and retinoblastoma presented with advanced disease, which contributed to the poor survival rates of 13% and 46%, respectively. The overall survival rate for lymphoma of 53%, and of 39% for all leukemias, compares poorly with the rates obtained in industrialized countries. The relatively poor 25% survival rate for tumors of the central nervous system may partly be due to the long delay between the initial diagnosis and the institution of appropriate treatment for raised intracranial pressure and for the tumor. Both cure and longterm follow-up are difficult to achieve in a developing country. Improved early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are necessary to improve survival rates. author's modified

Please refer to this item in SUNScholar by using the following persistent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/14178
This item appears in the following collections: