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Psychopharmacology of maternal separation anxiety in vervet monkeys.

dc.contributor.authorMarais L.
dc.contributor.authorDaniels W.
dc.contributor.authorBrand L.
dc.contributor.authorViljoen F.
dc.contributor.authorHugo C.
dc.contributor.authorStein D.J.
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-15T15:59:58Z
dc.date.available2011-05-15T15:59:58Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citationMetabolic brain disease
dc.identifier.citation21
dc.identifier.citation03-Feb
dc.identifier.issn8857490
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/11460
dc.description.abstractMaternal separation in non-human primates has been proposed as a model of early adversity. The symptoms of separation anxiety were studied in vervet monkeys, during the weaning period, when psychotropic medications were administered. The control group received a normal diet and treatment groups received citalopram, reboxetine or lamotrigine in their food daily. Treatment was given for 7 weeks starting 1 month prior to weaning. Behavior was recorded twice weekly for 8 weeks, and was rated for anxiety and depression. Cerebrospinal fluid was collected at the beginning and end of the trial and analyzed for monoamines and metabolites using High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Citalopram pretreatment prevented the reduction of affiliation behavior and reduced stereotypies after weaning, and both citalopram and reboxetine abolished the increase in activity seen in control monkeys after weaning, but no statistically significant differences were found between groups. Citalopram pretreatment also significantly increased noradrenaline and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels and reboxetine significantly decreased dopamine levels over time. The 5-HIAA levels of reboxetine and lamotrigine treated monkeys were significantly lower than that of the control group at the end of the trial. Although limited by a small sample size, this study demonstrates the possibility of investigating the psychopharmacology of early adversity in a non-human primate model.
dc.subjectadrenergic receptor affecting agent
dc.subjectamino acid receptor blocking agent
dc.subjectanticonvulsive agent
dc.subjectanxiolytic agent
dc.subjectbiogenic amine
dc.subjectcitalopram
dc.subjectlamotrigine
dc.subjectmorpholine derivative
dc.subjectreboxetine
dc.subjectserotonin uptake inhibitor
dc.subjecttriazine derivative
dc.subjectanimal
dc.subjectanimal behavior
dc.subjectarticle
dc.subjectCercopithecus
dc.subjectcerebrospinal fluid
dc.subjectdrug effect
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectmaternal deprivation
dc.subjectmotor activity
dc.subjectphysiology
dc.subjectseparation anxiety
dc.subjectstereotypy
dc.subjectAdrenergic Uptake Inhibitors
dc.subjectAnimals
dc.subjectAnti-Anxiety Agents
dc.subjectAnticonvulsants
dc.subjectAnxiety, Separation
dc.subjectBehavior, Animal
dc.subjectBiogenic Monoamines
dc.subjectCercopithecus aethiops
dc.subjectCitalopram
dc.subjectExcitatory Amino Acid Antagonists
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMaternal Deprivation
dc.subjectMorpholines
dc.subjectMotor Activity
dc.subjectSerotonin Uptake Inhibitors
dc.subjectStereotyped Behavior
dc.subjectTriazines
dc.titlePsychopharmacology of maternal separation anxiety in vervet monkeys.
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionArticle


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