Core/shell particles containing liquid cores: Morphology prediction, synthesis, and characterization

Core/shell particles containing liquid cores: Morphology prediction, synthesis, and characterization

Van Zyl, A.J.P. ; Sanderson, R.D. ; De Wet-Roos, D. ; Klumperman, B. ; Van Zyl, A.J.P. ; Sanderson, R.D. ; De Wet-Roos, D. ; Klumperman, B. (2003)

The ability to synthesize core/shell particles with distinct geometries is becoming increasingly important due to their potential applications. In this study structured particles with liquid cores and polymeric shells were synthesized by an in situ miniemulsion polymerization reaction. The resulting materials were used to evaluate morphology prediction models based on thermodynamic considerations. Results showed that thermodynamic models are inadequate for the morphology prediction of in situ polymerized species. For particles prepared in this way, kinetic influences, e.g. anchoring effects, chain mobility, and viscosity, play a significant role in defining the end morphology of the particles.

The ability to synthesize core/shell particles with distinct geometries is becoming increasingly important due to their potential applications. In this study structured particles with liquid cores and polymeric shells were synthesized by an in situ miniemulsion polymerization reaction. The resulting materials were used to evaluate morphology prediction models based on thermodynamic considerations. Results showed that thermodynamic models are inadequate for the morphology prediction of in situ polymerized species. For particles prepared in this way, kinetic influences, e.g. anchoring effects, chain mobility, and viscosity, play a significant role in defining the end morphology of the particles.

The ability to synthesize core/shell particles with distinct geometries is becoming increasingly important due to their potential applications. In this study structured particles with liquid cores and polymeric shells were synthesized by an in situ miniemulsion polymerization reaction. The resulting materials were used to evaluate morphology prediction models based on thermodynamic considerations. Results showed that thermodynamic models are inadequate for the morphology prediction of in situ polymerized species. For particles prepared in this way, kinetic influences, e.g. anchoring effects, chain mobility, and viscosity, play a significant role in defining the end morphology of the particles.

Please refer to this item in SUNScholar by using the following persistent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/11444
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