Leadership, corruption and the dignity of humans : some reflections from the Nigerian context

Kure, Kefas U. (2020)

CITATION: Kure, K. U. 2020. Leadership, corruption and the dignity of humans : some reflections from the Nigerian context. HTS Teologiese Studies / Theological Studies, 76(2):a5873, doi:10.4102/hts.v76i2.5873.

The original publication is available at https://hts.org.za

Publication of this article was funded by the Stellenbosch University Open Access Fund.

Article

Leadership inadequacy in Nigeria has contributed to the rise in corruption, which has undermined human dignity through insufficient provision of basic human needs. This happens because the leadership venerates self-interest to such an extent that enhancing human wellbeing is not considered important. To save Nigerians from this dilemma, this article calls for a new leadership ethics called ‘responsible leadership’, whose precepts protect and enhance human dignity and enforce adherence to the rule of law to curb the spread of corruption. This was carried out by surveying the present system of governance with its failures and how it has contributed to human dignity violations. It was found that poor leadership was responsible for the continuous spread of corruption and exposure of human dignity to violations through porous and inadequate provisions of basic human needs. However, this study concluded that new leadership ethics, which are inclusive and integrative, would appreciate and recognise the intrinsic worth of every human being, take its people from their present position to where they should be, and would reduce violation of human dignity purported through corruption. Contribution: The article argued for a new ethos of leadership that is responsible in nature, encompassing, and intentionally people-centred, which takes people from where they are to where they ought to be. It fits into the scope of the journal by way of inter-connecting different topics to produce a unifying idea.

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