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Establishing inclusive schools : Teachers’ perceptions of Inclusive Education Teams

dc.contributor.authorMfuthwana, Thembekaen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorDreyer, Lornaen_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-05T09:38:26Z
dc.date.available2019-02-05T09:38:26Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationMfuthwana, T. & Dreyer, L. 2018. Establishing inclusive schools : Teachers’ perceptions of Inclusive Education Teams. South African Journal of Education, 38(4):Art. #1703, doi:10.15700/saje.v38n4a1703en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn2076-3433 (online)
dc.identifier.issn0256-0100 (print)
dc.identifier.otherdoi:10.15700/saje.v38n4a1703
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/105386
dc.descriptionCITATION: Mfuthwana, T. & Dreyer, L. 2018. Establishing inclusive schools : Teachers’ perceptions of Inclusive Education Teams. South African Journal of Education, 38(4):Art. #1703, doi:10.15700/saje.v38n4a1703.en_ZA
dc.descriptionThe original publication is available at http://www.sajournalofeducation.co.zaen_ZA
dc.description.abstractThe international debate on colonialization is gaining momentum, primarily in the Americas, Africa and Australasia. Recent incidents in South Africa, such as the #Rhodesmustfall movement and the protest over rules on black girls’ hair at certain schools, have sparked renewed debates on (de-)colonisation in the education system. It has become critical that those concerned with educational transformation in a post-colonial, post-apartheid South Africa consider socio-political and historic contextual factors. This is especially so in their endeavours to implement inclusive education, with its imperative to provide equal and quality education and support for all. Educational transformation in South Africa is based on systemically positioned support structures. However, these structures have their roots in countries which do not have the same socio-political history and current contextual constraints as developing countries. The focus of this research was to understand teachers' perceptions of the role Inclusive Education Teams (IETs) play in establishing an inclusive school in the Western Cape Province. For this case study, teachers were purposefully selected from an inclusive school. Data were collected through semi-structured individual interviews and a focus group discussion. The findings show that, despite the in-service training provided by the IET, teachers still need continuous, contextually responsive support.en_ZA
dc.description.urihttp://www.sajournalofeducation.co.za/index.php/saje/article/view/1703
dc.format.extent10 pagesen_ZA
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_ZA
dc.publisherEducation Association of South Africaen_ZA
dc.subjectEducation and state -- South Africaen_ZA
dc.subjectInclusive education -- South Africaen_ZA
dc.subjectEducation -- Political aspects -- South Africaen_ZA
dc.subjectPublic schools -- South Africa -- Western Capeen_ZA
dc.subjectInclusive Education Teams (IETs)en_ZA
dc.titleEstablishing inclusive schools : Teachers’ perceptions of Inclusive Education Teamsen_ZA
dc.typeArticleen_ZA
dc.description.versionPublisher's versionen_ZA
dc.rights.holderAuthors retain copyrighten_ZA


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