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Anti-Group B Streptococcus antibody in infants born to mothers with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection

dc.contributor.authorLe Doare, Kirstyen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Laurenen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorKampmann, Beateen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorHeath, Paul Trafforden_ZA
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Stephenen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorHesseling, Anneke C.en_ZA
dc.contributor.authorGorringe, Andrewen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorJones, Christine Elizabethen_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-01T14:15:02Z
dc.date.available2018-10-01T14:15:02Z
dc.date.issued2015-01-29
dc.identifier.citationLe Doare, K. et al. 2015. Anti-Group B Streptococcus antibody in infants born to mothers with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Vaccine, 33(5):621-627, doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.12.025.
dc.identifier.issn0264-410X (online)
dc.identifier.otherdoi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.12.025
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/104545
dc.descriptionCITATION: Le Doare, K. et al. 2015. Anti-Group B Streptococcus antibody in infants born to mothers with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Vaccine, 33(5):621-627, doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.12.025.
dc.descriptionThe original publication is available at https://www.sciencedirect.com
dc.description.abstractBackground: HIV-exposed uninfected infants have increased infection risk and mortality compared to HIV-unexposed infants. HIV-exposed infants may be at increased risk of invasive GBS disease due to reduced maternal antibody against GBS. Methods: We quantified antibodies that bind to the surface of whole Group B Streptococcus (GBS) of serotypes Ia, Ib, II, III and V using novel flow cytometry assays in South African HIV-infected and non-infected mothers and their uninfected infants. Antibody-mediated complement C3b/iC3b deposition onto GBS of these serotypes was also quantified by a novel flow cytometry assay. Results: Geometric mean concentration (GMC) of both surface-binding anti-GBS antibody and antibody-mediated complement deposition onto GBS were reduced in HIV-infected women (n = 46) compared to HIV-uninfected women (n = 58) for ST1a (surface-binding: 19.3 vs 29.3; p = 0.003; complement deposition: 2.9 vs 5.3 SU/mL; p = 0.003), STIb (24.9 vs 47.6; p = 0.003; 2.6 vs 4.9 SU/mL; p = 0.003), STII (19.8 vs 50.0; p = 0.001; 3.1 vs 6.2 SU/mL; p = 0.001), STIII (27.8 vs 60.1; p = 0.001; 2.8 vs 5.3 SU/mL; p = 0.001) and STV (121.9 vs 185.6 SU/mL; p < 0.001) and in their infants for STIa (complement deposition 9.4 vs 27.0 SU/mL; p = 0.02), STIb (13.4 vs 24.5 SU/mL; p = 0.02), STII (14.6 vs 42.7 SU/mL; p = 0.03), STIII (26.6 vs 62.7 SU/mL; p = 0.03) and STV (90.4 vs 165.8 SU/mL; p = 0.04). Median transplacental transfer of antibody from HIV-infected women to their infants was reduced compared to HIV-uninfected women for GBS serotypes II (0.42 [IQR 0.22–0.59] vs 1.0 SU/mL [0.42–1.66]; p < 0.001), III (0.54 [0.31–1.03] vs 0.95 SU/mL [0.42–3.05], p = 0.05) and V (0.51 [0.28–0.79] vs 0.75 SU/mL [0.26–2.9], p = 0.04). The differences between infants remained significant at 16 weeks of age. Conclusions: Maternal HIV infection was associated with lower anti-GBS surface binding antibody concentration and antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition onto GBS bacteria of serotypes Ia, Ib, II, III and V. This may render these infants more susceptible to early and late onset GBS disease.en_ZA
dc.format.extent7 pages
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_ZA
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.subjectHIV infectionsen_ZA
dc.subjectStreptococcus agalactiaeen_ZA
dc.subjectHIV antibodiesen_ZA
dc.subjectHIV positive mothersen_ZA
dc.subjectInfection in infantsen_ZA
dc.titleAnti-Group B Streptococcus antibody in infants born to mothers with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectionen_ZA
dc.typeArticleen_ZA
dc.description.versionPublisher's version
dc.rights.holderAuthors retain copyright


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