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Undertaking individual transdisciplinary PhD research for sustainable development : case studies from South Africa

dc.contributor.authorVan Breda, Johnen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorMusango, Josephine K.en_ZA
dc.contributor.authorBrent, Alan C.en_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-07T10:23:14Z
dc.date.available2018-08-07T10:23:14Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationVan Breda, J., Musango, J. K. & Brent, Alan C. 2016. Undertaking individual transdisciplinary PhD research for sustainable development : case studies from South Africa. International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, 17(2):150-166, doi:10.1108/IJSHE-07-2014-0107
dc.identifier.issn1467-6370 (online)
dc.identifier.otherdoi:10.1108/IJSHE-07-2014-0107
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/104239
dc.descriptionCITATION:Van Breda, J., Musango, J. K. & Brent, Alan C. 2016. Undertaking individual transdisciplinary PhD research for sustainable development : case studies from South Africa. International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, 17(2):150-166, doi:10.1108/IJSHE-07-2014-0107.
dc.descriptionThe original publication is available at https://www.emeraldinsight.com
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This paper aims at improving the understanding of individual transdisciplinary PhD research in a developing country context, focusing on three individual PhD case studies in South Africa. Design/methodology/approach: The multiple-case method was used, and three completed transdisciplinary PhD research efforts undertaken at Stellenbosch University were selected. They were coordinated through the TsamaHub1, an inter-faculty platform at the University which organises educational modules for transdisciplinary research. Using actual research experiences and reflections of the three individual PhDs, the paper evaluates their work in terms of ontological, epistemological, methodological and methodical/methods aspects. Findings: The central challenge to individual PhD researchers is engagement with non-academic actors to enable joint problem formulation, analysis and transformation. To overcome this, the paper suggests that developing individual epistemic relationships to build ‘transdisciplinary epistemic communities’ should be considered for inclusion as an intentional aspect of transdisciplinary research design. Research limitations/implications: ‘Transdisciplinary epistemic communities’ is still a concept in its infancy and needs more work before it may be theoretically and practically useful. Practical implications: Continuously guiding the individual transdisciplinary research process in a reflexive, recursive, transparent and equal manner is absolutely critical, because transdisciplinary research cannot be done successfully if dominated by overly methods-driven approaches. Originality/value: The discourse around transdisciplinary methodology has major implications for the design of individual PhD research. The paper provides recommendations to enhance the theory and practice of individual transdisciplinary PhD research.en_ZA
dc.description.urihttps://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/full/10.1108/IJSHE-07-2014-0107
dc.format.extent18 pages
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_ZA
dc.publisherEmerald
dc.subjectOntologyen_ZA
dc.subjectInterdisciplinary researchen_ZA
dc.titleUndertaking individual transdisciplinary PhD research for sustainable development : case studies from South Africaen_ZA
dc.typeArticleen_ZA
dc.description.versionPost print
dc.rights.holderAuthors retain copyright


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