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Percutaneous coronary intervention still not accessible for many South Africans

dc.contributor.authorStassen, Willemen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorWallis, Leeen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorLambert, Craigen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorCastren, Maareten_ZA
dc.contributor.authorKurland, Lisaen_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-27T13:53:50Z
dc.date.available2018-06-27T13:53:50Z
dc.date.issued2017-09
dc.identifier.citationStassen, W. et al. 2017. Percutaneous coronary intervention still not accessible for many South Africans. African Journal of Emergency Medicine, 7(3):105–107. doi:10.1016/j.afjem.2017.01.001.en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn2211-419X (online)
dc.identifier.issn2211-419X (print)
dc.identifier.otherdoi:10.1016/j.afjem.2017.04.009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/104106
dc.descriptionCITATION: Stassen, W. et al. 2017. Percutaneous coronary intervention still not accessible for many South Africans. African Journal of Emergency Medicine, 7(3):105–107. doi:10.1016/j.afjem.2017.01.001.en_ZA
dc.descriptionThe original publication is available at https://www.afjem.orgen_ZA
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The incidence of myocardial infarction is rising in Sub-Saharan Africa. In order to reduce mortality, timely reperfusion by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or thrombolysis followed by PCI is required. South Africa has historically been characterised by inequities in healthcare access based on geographic and socioeconomic status. We aimed to determine the coverage of PCI-facilities in South Africa and relate this to access based on population and socio-economic status. Methods: This cross-sectional study obtained data from literature, directories, organisational databases and correspondence with Departments of Health and hospital groups. Data was analysed descriptively while Spearman’s Rho sought correlations between PCI-facility resources, population, poverty and medical insurance status. Results: South Africa has 62 PCI-facilities. Gauteng has the most PCI-facilities (n = 28) while the Northern Cape has none. Most PCI-facilities (n = 48; 77%) are owned by the private sector. A disparity exists between the number of private and state-owned PCI-facilities when compared to the poverty (r = 0.01; p = 0.17) and insurance status of individuals (r = 0.4; p = 0.27). Conclusion: For many South Africans, access to PCI-facilities and primary PCI is still impossible given their socio-economic status or geographical locale. Research is needed to determine the specific PCI-facility needs based on geographic and epidemiological aspects, and to develop a contextualised solution for South Africans suffering a myocardial infarction.en_ZA
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_ZA
dc.publisherElsevieren_ZA
dc.subjectMyocardial infarctionen_ZA
dc.subjectSub-Saharan Africaen_ZA
dc.subjectHealthcare accessen_ZA
dc.subjectSouth African health careen_ZA
dc.subjectPercutaneous coronary interventionen_ZA
dc.titlePercutaneous coronary intervention still not accessible for many South Africansen_ZA
dc.typeArticleen_ZA
dc.description.versionPublishers versionen_ZA
dc.rights.holderAfrican Federation for Emergency Medicineen_ZA


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