The role of personality, hardiness, resilience and grit in mediating subjective career success in commercial deep sea divers

Cunningham, Russell Neil (2018-03)

Thesis (MCom)--Stellenbosch University, 2018.

Thesis

ENGLISH SUMMARY : Since the 16th century, man has been diving in the waters around the world. This phenomenon initially came about as a form of exploration, but eventually, commercial interests lead to the formation of diving as an occupation (Commercial Diving, n.d.). Commercial Deep Sea Diving (CDSD) as an industry is responsible for a vast array of sub-aquatic activities that include bridge and pipeline maintenance and the construction of sub-aquatic structures. The industry attracts many artisan-type employees to work all over the world on various projects associated with a multiplicity of related industries. However, as a profession, very little research has been done on CDSDs. That research that is available stems from the 1970s and 1980s and focuses primarily on technical specifications of equipment, and medical phenomena. After extensive reviews of available literature, the researcher has found no research pertaining to psychological attributes of CDSDs - illustrating a clear gap in the knowledge currently held about CDSDs and the industry as a whole, as it pertains to psychology. Of further interest to the researcher are the parallels that the CDSD industry shares with military deployments - this is with reference to the fact that both military personnel and CDSDs are required to operate under stressful conditions, away from the support of their family and social circles (Lagrone, 1978). With this notion in mind, the researcher will investigate the influence that the possession of personality, hardiness, resilience and grit has on the subjective experiencing of career success (CS) by CDSDs as well as the inter-relationships between these constructs. This study may prove to be an inroad into the better understanding of the psychological make-up of CDSDs.

AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING : Geen opsomming beskikbaar.

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