Residual renal function in chronic dialysis is not associated with reduced erythropoietin-stimulating agent dose requirements : a cross-sectional study

Louw, Elizabeth Helene ; Chothia, Mogamat-Yazied (2017-11-25)

Louw, E. H. & Chothia, M. Y. 2017. Residual renal function in chronic dialysis is not associated with reduced erythropoietin-stimulating agent dose requirements : a cross-sectional study. BMC Nephrology, 18:336, doi:10.1186/s12882-017-0752-x

The original publication is available at https://bmcnephrol.biomedcentral.com

Article

Background: Anaemia is a very common problem in patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) and the use of erythropoietin-stimulating agents (ESA) has revolutionised its treatment. Residual renal function (RRF) is associated with a reduction in ESA resistance and mortality in chronic dialysis. The primary aim was to establish whether RRF has an association with ESA dose requirements in ESKD patients receiving chronic dialysis. Methods: A single center, cross-sectional study involving 100 chronic dialysis patients was conducted from December 2015 to May 2016. Participants were divided into two groups depending on presence of RRF, which was defined as a 24-h urine sample volume of ≥ 100 ml. Erythropoietin resistance index [ERI = total weekly ESA dose (IU)/weight (kg)/haemoglobin concentration (g/dL] was used as a measure of ESA dose requirements. Results: There was no difference in ERI between those with RRF as compared to those without (9.5 versus 11.0, respectively; P = 0.45). Also, ERI did not differ between those receiving haemodialysis as compared with peritoneal dialysis (10.8 versus 10.2, respectively; P = 0.84) or in those using renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers as compared with no RAS blocker use (11.6 versus 9.2, respectively; P = 0.10). Lower ERI was evident for those with cystic kidney disease as compared to those with other causes of ESKD (6.9 versus 16.5, respectively; P = 0.32) although this did not reach statistical significance. Higher ERI was found in those with evidence of systemic inflammation as compared to those without (16.5 versus 9.5, respectively; P = 0.003). Conclusions: There was no association between RRF and ESA dose requirements, irrespective of dialysis modality, RAS blocker use, primary renal disease or hyperparathyroidism.

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