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Unequal contribution of native South African phylogeographic lineages to the invasion of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, in Europe

dc.contributor.authorDe Busschere, Charlotteen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorCourant, Julienen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorHerrel, Anthonyen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorRebelo, Ruien_ZA
dc.contributor.authorRodder, Dennisen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorMeasey, G. Johnen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorBackeljau, Thierryen_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-14T14:18:32Z
dc.date.available2017-09-14T14:18:32Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationDe Busschere, C., et al. 2016. Unequal contribution of native South African phylogeographic lineages to the invasion of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis , in Europe. PeerJ, 4:e1659, doi:10.7717/peerj.1659en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn2167-8359 (online)
dc.identifier.otherdoi:10.7717/peerj.1659
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/102235
dc.descriptionCITATION: De Busschere, C., et al. 2016. Unequal contribution of native South African phylogeographic lineages to the invasion of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis , in Europe. PeerJ, 4:e1659, doi:10.7717/peerj.1659.en_ZA
dc.descriptionThe original publication is available at https://peerj.comen_ZA
dc.description.abstractDue to both deliberate and accidental introductions, invasive African Clawed Frog (Xenopus laevis) populations have become established worldwide. In this study, we investigate the geographic origins of invasive X. laevis populations in France and Portugal using the phylogeographic structure of X. laevis in its native South African range. In total, 80 individuals from the whole area known to be invaded in France and Portugal were analysed for two mitochondrial and three nuclear genes, allowing a comparison with 185 specimens from the native range. Our results show that native phylogeographic lineages have contributed differently to invasive European X. laevis populations. In Portugal, genetic and historical data suggest a single colonization event involving a small number of individuals from the south-western Cape region in South Africa. In contrast, French invasive X. laevis encompass two distinct native phylogeographic lineages, i.e., one from the south-western Cape region and one from the northern regions of South Africa. The French X. laevis population is the first example of a X. laevis invasion involving multiple lineages. Moreover, the lack of population structure based on nuclear DNA suggests a potential role for admixture within the invasive French population.en_ZA
dc.description.urihttps://peerj.com/articles/1659/
dc.format.extent21 pages : illustrations, mapsen_ZA
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_ZA
dc.publisherPeerJ
dc.subjectInvasive speciesen_ZA
dc.subjectAfrican clawed frogen_ZA
dc.subjectXenopus laevis -- Phylogeographic structureen_ZA
dc.subjectXenopus laevis -- Biogeographyen_ZA
dc.subjectXenopus laevis -- Population geneticsen_ZA
dc.subjectXenopus laevis -- Phylogeographyen_ZA
dc.titleUnequal contribution of native South African phylogeographic lineages to the invasion of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, in Europeen_ZA
dc.typeArticleen_ZA
dc.description.versionPublisher's versionen_ZA
dc.rights.holderAuthors retain copyrighten_ZA


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