ITEM VIEW

A geometrical model for testing bilateral symmetry of bamboo leaf with a simplified Gielis equation

dc.contributor.authorLin, Shuyanen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Lien_ZA
dc.contributor.authorReddy, Gadi V. P.en_ZA
dc.contributor.authorHui, Cangen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorGielis, Johanen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorDing, Yulongen_ZA
dc.contributor.authorShi, Peijianen_ZA
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-08T07:35:47Z
dc.date.available2017-08-08T07:35:47Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationLin, S., et al. 2016. A geometrical model for testing bilateral symmetry of bamboo leaf with a simplified Gielis equation. Ecology and Evolution, 6(19):6798–6806, doi:10.1002/ece3.2407en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn2045-7758 (online)
dc.identifier.otherdoi:10.1002/ece3.2407
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10019.1/102066
dc.descriptionCITATION: Lin, S., et al. 2016. A geometrical model for testing bilateral symmetry of bamboo leaf with a simplified Gielis equation. Ecology and Evolution, 6(19):6798–6806, doi:10.1002/ece3.2407.en_ZA
dc.descriptionThe original publication is available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.comen_ZA
dc.description.abstractThe size and shape of plant leaves change with growth, and an accurate description of leaf shape is crucial for describing plant morphogenesis and development. Bilateral symmetry, which has been widely observed but poorly examined, occurs in both dicot and monocot leaves, including all nominated bamboo species (approximately 1,300 species), of which at least 500 are found in China. Although there are apparent differences in leaf size among bamboo species due to genetic and environmental profiles, bamboo leaves have bilateral symmetry with parallel venation and appear similar across species. Here, we investigate whether the shape of bamboo leaves can be accurately described by a simplified Gielis equation, which consists of only two parameters (leaf length and shape) and produces a perfect bilateral shape. To test the applicability of this equation and the occurrence of bilateral symmetry, we first measured the leaf length of 42 bamboo species, examining >500 leaves per species. We then scanned 30 leaves per species that had approximately the same length as the median leaf length for that species. The leaf-shape data from scanned profiles were fitted to the simplified Gielis equation. Results confirmed that the equation fits the leaf-shape data extremely well, with the coefficients of determination being 0.995 on average. We further demonstrated the bilateral symmetry of bamboo leaves, with a clearly defined leaf-shape parameter of all 42 bamboo species investigated ranging from 0.02 to 0.1. This results in a simple and reliable tool for precise determination of bamboo species, with applications in forestry, ecology, and taxonomy.en_ZA
dc.description.urihttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ece3.2407/full
dc.format.extent9 pages : illustrations (some colour)en_ZA
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_ZA
dc.publisherWiley Open Accessen_ZA
dc.subjectLeaves -- Mathematical modelsen_ZA
dc.subjectGielis’ superformulaen_ZA
dc.subjectSymmetry (Mathematics)en_ZA
dc.subjectBamboo -- Anatomy -- Mathematical modelsen_ZA
dc.titleA geometrical model for testing bilateral symmetry of bamboo leaf with a simplified Gielis equationen_ZA
dc.typeArticleen_ZA
dc.description.versionPublisher's versionen_ZA
dc.rights.holderAuthors retain copyrighten_ZA


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

ITEM VIEW